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HYBRID MODEL PROTOTYPE PROCESS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007877D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-May-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Chris Nelson: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Many technologies are available for creating a part which represents the desired geometry for a design. A common problem is the inability to use one specific process (i.e. machining, stereolithography, etc.) for the entire part due to a specific region for which the process is unsuitable. These local areas may completely disallow use of a model creation technique or cause unreasonable manufacturing times.

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Technical Developments

HYBRID MODEL PROTOTYPE PROCESS

by Chris Nelson, Robert Shisler and E. Derek Smith

  Many technologies are available for creating a part which represents the desired geometry for a design. A common problem is the inability to use one specific process (i.e. machining, stereolithography, etc.) for the entire part due to a specific region for which the process is unsuitable. These local areas may completely disallow use of a model creation technique or cause unreasonable manufacturing times.

  A geometric model was identified as having spe- cific local areas for which particular processes were ideally suited. This particular design contained a large relatively flat area best suited to machining tech- niques, and another complex area for which

stereolithography was the best application. The flat section limited the use of stereolithography as the optimum process for the entire part, while the com- plex section limited machining of the entire part. The result was to produce each element indepen- dently using the best technique for each section. A locating and joining mechanism was devised to join the components subsequent to processing. In addi- tion to solving the local processing limitations, the total cycle time was reduced from approximately six days to two and one half days, resulting in a 140% cycle time improvement. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the two separate parts sectioned from the original model.

Fig. 1 Large flat section ofpart best suited...