Browse Prior Art Database

HANDOFF LOW PRIORITY TO FREE CHANNEL FOR HIGHER PRIORITY REQUEST

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008018D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-May-13
Document File: 1 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Perry Denton: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A user can be queued waiting for a resource to become available, but if the resource does not free up, the user will get a busy signal. A simple solution to this would have an existing lower priority call be disconnected to free up a channel when a higher priority request comes in, but the lower priority user would be disgruntled and dissatisfied with his cellu- lar service.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

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HANDOFF LOW PRIORITY TO FREE CHANNEL FOR HIGHER PRIORITY REQUEST

by Perry Denton, Tricia Blohm and Chris Griffin

BACKGROUND SOLUTION

  A user can be queued waiting for a resource to become available, but if the resource does not free up, the user will get a busy signal. A simple solution to this would have an existing lower priority call be disconnected to free up a channel when a higher priority request comes in, but the lower priority user would be disgruntled and dissatisfied with his cellu- lar service.

  On a busy site, a higher priority call would be queued while a lower priority call would be told to handout of its cell to free up the channel for the higher priority call. When the lower priority call has left the channel, the resource would be given to the queued higher priority call.

  Freeing up a channel during the time in which a higher priority call has been queued, while not dis- connecting the lower priority call satisfies both users needs. By choosing to purchase a more expen- sive service, the higher priority user would be pro- vided with improved access into the cellular net- work.

0 h4otLmda. 1°C. 19% 69 March 1997

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