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INCREASED TAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE THROUGH MULTIPLE SIMULTANEOUS VOTING ELEMENTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008047D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-May-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Phil Hargrave: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The present invention relates to internal digital voter operation in a Comparator. In current Comparators, when two digital mode subscribers collide, at least one is always lost. The Comparator chooses a subscriber to route and discards any other subscriber's signals. This is a result of single threaded voting. Only one subscriber's signal is voted at a time and all others are discarded.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

INCREASED TAC" SYSTEM PERFORMANCE THROUGH MULTIPLE SIMULTANEOUS VOTING ELEMENTS

by Phil Hargrave and Keith Eberlein

BACKGROUND/PROBLEM

  The present invention relates to internal digital voter operation in a Comparator. In current Comparators, when two digital mode subscribers collide, at least one is always lost. The Comparator chooses a subscriber to route and discards any other subscriber's signals. This is a result of single threaded voting. Only one subscriber's signal is voted at a time and all others are discarded.

  The single threaded nature of the voting process puts many constraints on the system. When two data subscribers collide, the subscriber's signal that is not chosen is discarded. When two voice sub- scribers collide and the chosen subscriber dekeys, the voter must sort out the remaining inputs to determine if there is a second subscriber transmit- ting. This takes time and reduces the efficiency of the system.

  The idea of processing multiple messages simultaneously in a single box has been done before in ArdisTM with data packets. The Ardis system, however, does not "vote" in the sense that is implied here, it simply stores up the data packets, checks the CRCs for bit errors (discarding packets with errors), and then checks for duplicate packets (discarding the duplicates). The CRC and duplicate

checking constitutes the selection of a "context" in a Comparator. The Comparator then can take multi-

ple copies within a context...