Browse Prior Art Database

WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALARM SYSTEM FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008097D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-May-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 109K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Mark Spiotta: AUTHOR

Abstract

Currently, smoke alarms, carbon monoxide detectors, infant breathing monitors, and burglar alarms all rely on visual or audible feedback to alert the user of an emergency condition. While this approach serves many applications, deaf users find themselves at a severe disadvantage. For example, smoke or carbon monoxide alarms aimed at the hearing-impaired market utilize white light indica- tors in addition to the normal audible alarm. However, when the user is sleeping, even a flashing light in another room may not alert the user, result- ing in a potential deadly situation. Therefore, what is needed is an alternate means of alerting a deaf or hearing-impaired person to an alarm condition.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALARM SYSTEM FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED

by Mark Spiotta

PROBLEM SOLVED BY THE INVENTION

  Currently, smoke alarms, carbon monoxide detectors, infant breathing monitors, and burglar alarms all rely on visual or audible feedback to alert the user of an emergency condition. While this approach serves many applications, deaf users find themselves at a severe disadvantage. For example, smoke or carbon monoxide alarms aimed at the hearing-impaired market utilize white light indica- tors in addition to the normal audible alarm. However, when the user is sleeping, even a flashing light in another room may not alert the user, result- ing in a potential deadly situation. Therefore, what is needed is an alternate means of alerting a deaf or hearing-impaired person to an alarm condition.

  The system described herein is a wireless alarm system which links a multiplicity of household emergency alarm generators with a tactile feedback alarm receiver. The tactile feedback alarm receiver can alert a hearing-impaired user of an emergency condition, even if the user is sleeping or located in another room in the house.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As shown in the figure below, each alarm unit
(i.e. smoke detector, carbon monoxide detector, bur- glar alarm, infant monitor, etc.) is equipped with a low-power RF transmitter. The receiving unit con- sists of an RF receiver housed in either a bracelet, wristwatch, or the like-very similar to Motorola's wrist pager product.

Transmitter #l Transmitter #2 Transmitter #3 Transmitter #4

Wireless Alarm System Diagram

0 Matamla, 1°C. 1997

173 March 1997

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MO7OROLA Technical Developments

  When any alarm device is activated, it transmits a special code to the wristband receiver, which would then activate a vibration mode tactile feed- back device, similar to that found in pagers and cel- lular phones today. Optionally, the wristband receiver would also display the source of the alarm.

  A common RF alerting link is shared among a multiplicity of alerting devices, each of which can directly activate the vibrating annunciator. In addi- tion, an overlapping time-slotted transmisson proto- col enables unique detection of e...