Browse Prior Art Database

RUTHFUL PRIORITY CALL IN A TRUNKED RADIO SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008121D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-May-20
Document File: 4 page(s) / 204K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Leonard Wurtzel: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a trunking radio system, radio units and other communication equipment contend for the use of a limited number of air traffic channels. Existing techniques ensure that traffic channels are not monopolized by any party for an unlimited period of time. However, any call, except an emergency call initiated when the system does not need to have traf5c channels available, will have to wait until the required channels become available through the completion of other calls. In a busy system, there can be annoying periods whilst waiting for other calls to finish and relinquish their radio trafIic chan- nels before a desired call can be assigned its required channel resources. In an all-voice commu- nications system a user must wait because another user is making use of a channel resource needed for his call. In a mixed voice and data system, a user attempting to initiate a voice call may have to wait for a computer to complete its previously initi- ated data call and relinquish its allocated traffic channels.

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MOIY)ROLA Technical Developments

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RUTHFUL PRIORITY CALL IN A TRUNKED RADIO SYSTEM

by Leonard Wurtzel, David Bar-On

INTRODUCTION

  In a trunking radio system, radio units and other communication equipment contend for the use of a limited number of air traffic channels. Existing techniques ensure that traffic channels are not monopolized by any party for an unlimited period of time. However, any call, except an emergency call initiated when the system does not need to have traf5c channels available, will have to wait until the required channels become available through the completion of other calls. In a busy system, there can be annoying periods whilst waiting for other calls to finish and relinquish their radio trafIic chan- nels before a desired call can be assigned its required channel resources. In an all-voice commu- nications system a user must wait because another user is making use of a channel resource needed for his call. In a mixed voice and data system, a user attempting to initiate a voice call may have to wait for a computer to complete its previously initi- ated data call and relinquish its allocated traffic channels.

PROBLEM(S) TO BE SOLVED

  The problem to be resolved is the accommoda- tion of a human user at the expense of the automatic user by providing a mechanism for ensuring that a call, for which waiting is less tolerable, will not have to wait for the completion of another call for which waiting and interruption are acceptable. Typically, the latter type of call will always auto- matically make way for the former. In addition, data calls that require channel resources for an extended period of time, e.g. calls that no longer vie with them for traffic channel resources. At the same time, data calls are interrupted, e.g. medical moni- toring calls, due to their equal priority to that of voice calls. This causes wasted, idle channel time which could be utilized without adversely affecting the normal operation of the system. Using current

technologies, an attempt to make full use of avail- able channels will result in contention with other users of the system for the channel resources. Using the solution proposed herein, idle channel time can be used productively, in an unobtrusive manner, transparent to preferred users of the system.

CLOSEST KNOWN TECHNOLOGY

  Ruthless traffic channel allocation is currently performed when a traffic channel of a non-emer- gency call is reclaimed by the system in order to provide a channel for an emergency call. The solu- tion proposed in this paper includes interrupting ruthful priority calls in a similar fashion in order to provide traffic channels for normal, priority, or emergency calls. A major difference is that the ruth- less interruption for emergency calls is done with- out warning to the interrupted user and only in extraordinary circumstances. It is destructive, and disruptive to the normal operation of the system; for that reason it is reserved for very rare circum- stanc...