Browse Prior Art Database

REPEATER AVAILABLE TONES FOR CONVENTIONAL SCAN EQUIPPED REPEATERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008137D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-May-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Paul Matzarath: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A conventional repeater programmed with multiple channels has the capability of scanning for receiver activity between programmed channels. The scanning process looks for receive activity on each of the channels listed in a preprogrammed scan list by checking for the presence of carrier on each channel and optionally for the subaudible signalling, PL or DPL, on each channel. Whenever activity is detected on a channel, the scanning activ- ity stops and repeater services are only rendered to users on that channel. Users on the other channels have temporarily lost access to the repeater. Because the repeater is locked on the channel where activity was first detected, the repeater has no way of notifying users on the other channels, who may wish to use the repeater, that the repeater is not currently available for use.

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MoToRolA Technical Developments

REPEATER AVAILABLE TONES FOR CONVENTIONAL SCAN EQUIPPED REPEATERS

by Paul Matzarath and Pete Biancalana

  A conventional repeater programmed with multiple channels has the capability of scanning for receiver activity between programmed channels. The scanning process looks for receive activity on each of the channels listed in a preprogrammed scan list by checking for the presence of carrier on each channel and optionally for the subaudible signalling, PL or DPL, on each channel. Whenever activity is detected on a channel, the scanning activ- ity stops and repeater services are only rendered to users on that channel. Users on the other channels have temporarily lost access to the repeater. Because the repeater is locked on the channel where activity was first detected, the repeater has no way of notifying users on the other channels, who may wish to use the repeater, that the repeater is not currently available for use.

  For this mode of operation, that is, when the repeater is in use on one channel, all other users, who are not assigned to the active channel, do have an optional method of communication. The users can switch to the talk around frequency if they wish to communicate. While one or more of the groups are in talk around mode, the repeater resource may become available. However, anyone actively engaged in a talk around call will not be aware that the repeater is available since the taIk around fre- quency used is the transmit frequency of the station and even though transmissions take place, they do not take place on the station's receive frequency. Thus the station is not able t...