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Browse Prior Art Database

SHIELDING APPARATUS SUITABLE FOR AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008338D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jun-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 199K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Scott R. Semenik: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Radiotelephones, computers and other electronic equipment often generate electromagnetic and radio frequency signals in one portion of the equipment which may radiate to, and interfere with, another portion of the equipment. To minimize this interfer- ence effect, electrically conducting material is inter- posed between portions of the electronic circuitry of the equipment.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

SHIELDING APPARATUS SUITABLE FOR AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY

by Scott R. Semenik, Martin J. Kimbell and Mark W. Schwartz

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

  Radiotelephones, computers and other electronic equipment often generate electromagnetic and radio frequency signals in one portion of the equipment which may radiate to, and interfere with, another portion of the equipment. To minimize this interfer- ence effect, electrically conducting material is inter- posed between portions of the electronic circuitry of the equipment.

  One type of shielding material takes the form of a shielding apparatus comprising a metal cover that detachably engages metal "W-shaped channel clips. The clips are attached to a circuit board around the portion of the electronic circuitry that generates an interfering signal and/or around the portion of the electronic circuitry that is susceptible to an interfering signal. However, the clips do not provide a top surface suitable for engagement by with an automated small part placement machine. As such, the clips cannot be attached to the circuit board via the same automated machine used to attach the electronic circuitry to the circuit board. This results in increased manufacturing cycle time of the equipment from attaching the clips by hand and/or increased cost from acquiring dedicated equipment to attach the clips.

SOLUTION

  The shieldin~g apparatus 100, shown in Figure 1, can be attached to a circuit board 102 by the same automated machine used to mount electronic circuitry 104. The shielding apparatus 100 comprises covers 106 and 108 and a plurality of posts I IO. Each of the covers 106 and 108 comprise a substan- tially planar top surface I1 2 and side walls 114 extending orthogonally downward from the top surface 112. The top surface 112 provides a surface suitable for engagement by an automated large part placement machine (not shown). The side walls 114

include a plurality of fingers 116 formed between oblong notches I1 8 in the sidewalls 114. The notches 118 permit deflection of the plurality of ringers 116 in a plane parallel to the top surface 112. Each of the plurality of fingers 116 includes a rectangular slot 120 extending therethrough. The covers 106 and 108 are fabricated using a known progressive stamping technique or a known slide tool technique, from a 0.05 mm to a 0.30 mm thick sheet of a nickel- silver alloy, a tin-plated steel, or other suitable material.

  Each of the plurality of posts 110, such as post 122, comprise a base 124, a head 126, and a neck 128 extending therebetween, as shown in the enlargement window of Figure 1. The base 124 and the neck 128 are cylindrical. The head 126 comprises both a cylindrical portion engaging the neck 128 and a substantially conical portion extending upward from the cylindrical portion. The posts 110 are dimensionally constrained for packaging into a tape and reel assembly used by an automated small part placement machine (not shown) to su...