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PROCESSING OF COMMON ADDRESSES IN A MULTIPLE CHANNEL PAGING ENVIRONMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008401D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jun-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Karl R. Weiss: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In a FLEXT" roaming environment, a pager can be operating within an overlap area between differ- ent coverage areas. In such an overlap area, for example as shown in position A of Figure I on the next page, the pager can be receiving valid signals on one or more channels and, therefore, has to monitor all the channels. The pager can monitor all the channels by using frame offset values that are unique to each of the channels as shown, for example, with two channels in Figure 2.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

PROCESSING OF COMMON ADDRESSES IN A MULTIPLE CHANNEL PAGING ENVIRONMENT

by Karl R. Weiss, Ngai Kim Hoong and Ong Dee Nai

  In a FLEXT" roaming environment, a pager can be operating within an overlap area between differ- ent coverage areas. In such an overlap area, for example as shown in position A of Figure I on the next page, the pager can be receiving valid signals on one or more channels and, therefore, has to monitor all the channels. The pager can monitor all the channels by using frame offset values that are unique to each of the channels as shown, for example, with two channels in Figure 2.

  A pager operating in the FLEXT" roaming envi- ronment typically has a list of addresses to monitor. These addresses are either individual or common addresses. Individual addresses have a frame offset value whereas common addresses do not. Base frames from which frame offset addresses are deter- mined are the same for each of the individual addresses. This guarantees frame offsetting so that frame offset messages are received in overlap areas. Base frames of common addresses cannot be easily aligned with base frames of individual addresses because the individual addresses are unique to a pager and differs for different pagers.

If the pager receives messages for all addresses

in an overlap area, there is a potential for a conflict between two or more channels. Such a conflict can cause a common address on one channel to block the recepti...