Browse Prior Art Database

Location Based 911 Call Center Outgoing Message Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008412D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Jun-12
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jun-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

John M. Harris: INVENTOR [+3]

Abstract

Proposes a method for using the wireless location of a mobile, and the location of known emergencies to control the outgoing message from an emergency call center (911,311, Power company, etc..). Additionally, it is proposed that this method only be employed when the call center is overloaded. This is intended to filter out repetitive calls when the call center is overloaded.

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Location Based 911 Call Center Outgoing Message Control

John M. Harris, Jeff Frager & Kim Vought


Abstract – Proposes a method for using the wireless location of  a mobile, and the location of known ‘emergencies’ to control the outgoing message from an emergency call center (911,311, Power company, etc..).  Additionally, it is proposed that this method only be employed when the call center is overloaded. This is intended to filter out repetitive calls when the call center is overloaded.

I.                  Introduction

After a highly visible emergency, hundreds of calls may report the same emergency, overwhelming capacity of 911 system, and/or that of wireless system. 

Currently, when 911 systems become overloaded, they play a single outgoing message.  Often this message is set to inform the callers that the 911 call center is overloaded and that they know about the specific car fire on the specific road that they are currently hearing about.  This current algorithm is good in that it reduces the load to the 911 call center because some callers hang up when they hear this message because they are calling to report that event.

However, it wastes the precious time, attention and energy of the callers who are not calling for that reason.  A number of these callers are very unlikely to be calling about the specific accident mentioned in the outgoing message, as evidenced by their location.

Additionally, this current method results in many callers waiting longer to get to an operator, in a situation where an operator is truly necessary.  This is because, if the system is loaded beyond capacity the outgoing messages are played to each caller regardless of  the location from which they are calling, .

The incremental value of one more call reporting an event which has already reported multiple times is smaller, than the value of receiving a single new call which reports another a new currently unreported event.  A call from a geographic area where no event has recently been reported is more likely to be reporting a new event. 

Such an event can stress cellular system capacity, due to the repetitive.   The algorithm proposed in this paper does not result in any more delay for callers who are calling from an area of an emergency that would occur with the prior art. This problem also applies to 311 call centers.

II.                 Algorithm Proposed:

This algorithm proposes techniques for allowing the system to prioritize emergency calls (including those not to 911) relative to others, in an efficient, effective, implementable manner.

1)                 If it is detected, that multiple calls are queuing because the 911 call center is overloaded.

                               i.            During the first 2 seconds, play the general messages that the 911 call center is overloaded.

                             ii.            For the calls which have been queuing for at least 2 seconds (so their location information has arrived), selectively decide what announcement to play.         

1.          If the calls is from the 90/94 split, then: play "We know about the tanker over flow, so you can hang up if that is wh...