Browse Prior Art Database

Optimized Sputter Tool Magnet Configuration for Improving Wafer Film Uniformity and Sputter Target Utilization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008467D
Publication Date: 2002-Jun-17
Document File: 3 page(s) / 221K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for improving wafer film uniformity and sputter target utilization by optimizing the sputter tool magnet configuration. Benefits include the elimination of erosion "profiles," or grooves, on the sputtering target.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 70% of the total text.

Optimized Sputter Tool Magnet Configuration for Improving Wafer Film Uniformity and Sputter Target Utilization

Disclosed is a method for improving wafer film uniformity and sputter target utilization by optimizing the sputter tool magnet configuration. Benefits include the elimination of erosion "profiles," or grooves, on the sputtering target.

Background

Sputtering is a process where ions are generated, accelerated, and then impacted on a target material. The energy of the ion is transferred into the target material, and this action ejects target atoms. The ejected target atoms can then be used to produce a thin film on a silicon wafer (see Figure 1).

Ions are typically generated by a plasma, which can be created by establishing an electric field between two electrodes, then introducing low pressure Argon (Ar) between the electrodes. The electric field ionizes the Ar, and accelerates the positive ion toward the negative electrode or target material (see Figure 2).

General Description

Sputter rates depend on the density of ions produced. To increase sputter rates, magnets are placed on the back side of the negative electrode or target. The magnets "hold" electrons near the surface of the target , increasing further Ar ionization and minimizing Ar ion/electron combinations. This confines sputtering events to areas near the magnet.

In current sputter systems, the magnets rotate in a simple circular pattern. The result is an erosion "profile," or groove, in the sputtering targe...