Browse Prior Art Database

DISPENSED INTERCONNECTION BUMPS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008515D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jun-19
Document File: 3 page(s) / 143K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

David Clegg: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

There are many means by which semiconductor devices are electrically connected to the outside wor!d. Typically, the "first level" of this connection scheme usually takes the form of a semiconductor "package." A first level package most commonly consists of a semiconductor device bonded electri- cally and mechanically to a larger substrate with some integral type of external electrical contacts routing back to the semiconductor. This first level package is then in-turn mounted on a larger printed circuit board for its end-use application.

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Page 1 of 3

MOTOROLA Technical Developments

DISPENSED INTERCONNECTION BUMPS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES

by David Clegg, Jeff Jones and Gordon Wesley

  There are many means by which semiconductor devices are electrically connected to the outside wor!d. Typically, the "first level" of this connection scheme usually takes the form of a semiconductor "package." A first level package most commonly consists of a semiconductor device bonded electri- cally and mechanically to a larger substrate with some integral type of external electrical contacts routing back to the semiconductor. This first level package is then in-turn mounted on a larger printed

circuit board for its end-use application.

  One means to form an electrical and mechanical interconnect between the semiconductor device 110 and its corresponding substrate 120 in the first level package (see Figure I), utilizes solder structures 118 on the surface of the semiconductor device I IO that are reflowed to the receiving pads 128 on the substrate 120.

Fig. 1 On the left, a semiconductor device 110 with bumped solder structures 118 shown prior to placement on its corresponding Ceramic Ball Grid Array (CBGA) substrate 120 with receiving pads 128. On the right is the completed first level package after the solder structures 1 I8 have been reflowed to the CBGA substrate's 120 receiving pads 128.

  These solder structures I1 8 on the semiconductor device 110 are often called "bumps" and the pack- aging technology referred to as "flip chip." As shown in Figure 2, solder bumps 118 are applied to the semiconductor device's I IO input/output pads 114. Bumps 118 for flip chip devices are most typi- cally formed with evaporative technology or in some more recent developmental processes, chemi- cal bath plating, and other means. These methods are not typically used with singulated devices (i.e.,

most often wafers are bumped), and require exten- sive process time, costly equipment for processing, and require that both good and bad die are bumped because bumping is performed at a wafer level prior to full electrical testing. The Dispensed Bump method described in this article provides a means to tirst-time bump individual devices (good die only when in wafer form), or on a singulated-die or prototype basis.

G Motorola. 1°C. ,997

183 December 1997

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Page 2 of 3

MOTOROLA Technical Developments

Semiconductor Device

with Bumped Solder

Structures on I/O Pads

Fig. 2 On the left, a semiconductor device with the typical perimeter Input/Output pads, and on the right, a bumped device after a bumping process.

  The original equipment configuration supporting the Dispensed Bump method utilized an air-pres- sure driven syringe dispense station 200 (see Figure
3), a micromanipulator 210 to hold the syringe 220 and precisely locate the syringe tip, a toolmakers microscope (or microscope 230 with a precision x-y table...