Browse Prior Art Database

SYNCHRONIZING FAST NETWORK MANAGEMENT EVENT BURST WITH SLOWER MIS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008525D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jun-20
Document File: 4 page(s) / 222K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Plamen Petrov: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The iDEN wireless network consists of multiple Network elements, managed by the Operations and Maintenance Center-Radio (OMC-R). The Network Elements report to the OMC-R changes in their states, as well as failure conditions through unsolicited events. The events are fed into a Correlation Services application, which correlates the events, identifies the statuses of the Network Elements and updates the Management Information System (MIS) with the new statuses. Since the Network Elements are interconnected and depend on each other for proper functioning, some failures on the network can result in a very high number of events being generated by the different Network Elements, all of them sent to the OMC-R. These event bursts result in a lot of new statuses, which the Correlation Services application tries to update in the Management Information System (MIS). A lot of those status updates are intermediate-the Network Element can go through several states EvenD' miva, lab m ewnw?ac r--- _--.

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0 M

MOTOROLA Technical Developments

SYNCHRONIZING FAST NETWORK MANAGEMENT

EVENT BURST WITH SLOWER MIS

by Plamen Petrov and David Cong

1 INTRODUCTION TO THE PROBLEM

  The iDEN wireless network consists of multiple Network elements, managed by the Operations and Maintenance Center-Radio (OMC-R). The Network Elements report to the OMC-R changes in their states, as well as failure conditions through unsolicited events. The events are fed into a Correlation Services application, which correlates the events, identifies the statuses of the Network Elements and updates the Management Information System (MIS) with the new statuses. Since the Network Elements are interconnected and depend on each other for proper functioning, some failures on the network can result in a very high number of events being generated by the different Network Elements, all of them sent to the OMC-R. These event bursts result in a lot of new statuses, which the Correlation Services application tries to update in the Management Information System (MIS). A lot of those status updates are intermediate-the Network Element can go through several states

EvenD' miva, lab m ewnw?ac r--- _--.

before it reaches its final state for a current burst of events. Additionally, Network Elements can go through the same states a lot of times during the burst, due to system instability (e.g. line jitters), when a major failure occurs. As a result, a high volume of status updates are sent to the MIS. The MIS is a sophisticated, general purpose application and data store, and relatively slow, compared to the rate at which updates are generated by the Correlation Services application. MIS can handle the update traffic in normal operation, and in most burst situa- tions. However, when some major failure occur, the rate at which events arrive at the Correlation Services application is much higher than the rate, at which the Correlation Services application can update the MIS, resulting in overflow at the Correlation Services application (message queues overflow). Correlation Services application doesn't need to update MIS with every status change for a certain Network Element, only with the latest one in a burst of events.

  Events arrive at a variable rate of m events per which MIS can be updated (update capacity) is n second. In every instance, the events' arrival rate m updates per second. Normally, the rate r at which is smaller than the input capacity of Correlation Correlation Services updates MIS is below the Services-p events per second (m<p). The rate r at update capacity n of MIS (r<n). Briefly, in normal which correlation services tries to update MIS is operation the following relation holds:
roughly the same as the events' arrival rate m into

Correlation Services (m=r). The maximum rate at m=r<n<p

:x2 Mo,orola. Inc. 1w7

196 December 1997

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m MOTOROLA Technical Developments

  The problem occurs when a large burst of...