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Browse Prior Art Database

MOBILE INITIATED LANDLINE MESSAGE DELIVERY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008613D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jun-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Timothy A. Auch: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a trunked mobile radio environment, it is desirable to conserve voice channel air-time. It is also desirable to minimize the amount of time that a mobile user spends sending messages, especially standard or repeated messages, to a landline recipient.

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CR

MOTOROLA Technical Developments

MOBILE INITIATED LANDLINE MESSAGE DELIVERY

by Timothy A. Auch and Patrick B. Cicero

PROBLEM STATEMENT

  In a trunked mobile radio environment, it is desirable to conserve voice channel air-time. It is also desirable to minimize the amount of time that a mobile user spends sending messages, especially standard or repeated messages, to a landline recipient.

  An example repeated message may be a mes- sage left by a delivery company to customer, "This is Sam, of xyz trucking, your package has been delivered." This message might be sent after every delivery made.

  In a private system the primary benefits would be reduced voice channel access and fast and silent message delivery. In a shared system, the primary benefits would be easy delivery of a repetitive message for a user and a value-added feature to the system operator.

SOLUTION

  A method of pre-recording messages for later delivety with initiation over the control channel can address these concerns.

  The radio infrastructure would allow the user to access a database from both the telephone and a radio. From a telephone, the user wocld dial an access number to the system and then enter his

radio ID and password. From the radio, the user would begin an telephone interconnect call and enter an access code and then enter his password.

  The user would then have access to a number of options via an IVR (Interactive Voice Response) menu. These would include changing the password and reviewin...