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A TEXT ENTRY TECHNIQUE FOR SCROLLING KEYBOARDS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008693D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

James E. Womack: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Scrolling keyboards allow the user of a personal communications device (PCD) to move around an alphabet on a LCD screen with arrow keys and select letters as they construct a message (see Figure I). Text entry for initiating a message on such a device can be a long, tedious and clumsy process. Because some words have many letters and sometimes the letters are at different ends of the alphabet, it takes many keystrokes to enter a message. A technique that utilizes word and sentence completion can greatly speed the text entry process. This will allow users to enter more complete and comprehensible messages more easily.

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MOTOROLA Technicd Developments

A TEXT ENTRY TECHNIQUE FOR SCROLLING KEYBOARDS

by James E. Womack and Martin Hermesch

INTRODUCTION

  Scrolling keyboards allow the user of a personal communications device (PCD) to move around an alphabet on a LCD screen with arrow keys and select letters as they construct a message (see Figure I). Text entry for initiating a message on such a device can be a long, tedious and clumsy process. Because some words have many letters and sometimes the letters are at different ends of the alphabet, it takes many keystrokes to enter a message. A technique that utilizes word and sentence completion can greatly speed the text entry process. This will allow users to enter more complete and comprehensible messages more easily.

TECHNIQUE

  If the words an individual user entered most often while sending messages were known, a search table could be scanned and used to complete these words as they are being entered. This table would be searched after each letter entry and a completed word would be offered to the user. Take for example the word "was." To enter this word it takes 14 moves: 6 to get to 'w,' 6 to get back to 'a,' and 2 to get to 's.' If the user typically finished the word with 'was' whenever they entered a 'w,' many

moves could be saved by offering the completed word; further, if 'Washington' was used almost as often, it could be offered instead because it requires more key strokes on average. This technique could be expanded to include sentence completion.

  The most straightforward implementation is through the maintenance of a search table. The table maintenance would comprise of noting the words used each time a message is sent and how many letters (or keystrokes) each word requires. The words would then be ran...