Browse Prior Art Database

Finding your car

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008702D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Jul-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Salomon Serfaty: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In large shopping mall, a customer is sometimes faced with the problem of forgetting where he or she parked her car before going into the shopping mall. We present a system to solve this problem.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Finding your car

by Salomon Serfaty and Gadi Shirazi

Abstract

In large shopping mall, a customer is sometimes faced with the problem of forgetting where he or she parked her car before going into the shopping mall.

We present a system to solve this problem.

Introduction

In large shopping mall, a customer is sometimes faced with the problem of forgetting where he or she parked her car. Due to the similarities of some of the exits, the customer may be convinced that the actual exit he or she decided to go out from is the one where the car is parked, being sometimes completely wrong.

A system or technique that could solve the problem could ease this sometimes-annoying situation

Problem To Be Solved

We are aware of tiny radio transmitters and receivers systems where the receiver is mounted in the car. The user transmits a signal that is detected by the car. The car can, in this case, activate its horn and or light so that the user, guided by the sound can locate his car. This solution is acceptable once the user knows on which exit the car is parked. This method is limited to a small area and only when the user is close to his car.  When the exit is unknown, it can hardly help.

Proposed Solution to the Problem

Modern communication subscriber will be able to locate themselves as a requirement of the E911 regulations that will shortly be enforced, at least in the US. We propose to use this information to solve the above problem.

We assume that the user has a personal communication device such as a cell phone. When the user stops its car in the parking lot, the location-enabled subscriber automatically stores its location. The portable subscriber when in the car cradle can accomplish this by sensing, for example, that the ignition of the car has gone off. The user could also do it manually.

Once the user needs to locate his car, there could be several options.

1.      Assume that the user gets out of the shopping mall at an exit and asks the device to...