Browse Prior Art Database

CHANNEL ALLOCATION BASED ON HISTORICAL CHANNEL PERFORMANCE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008722D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Kris Cramer: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In today's system, a channel's health is deter- mined by testing the channel periodically while it is idle and at the beginning and end of each call. These tests help determine if the channel is usable by the system preferably before a call is assigned. When a failure is detected, the channel is taken out of service by the system so it is not used for calls, This method works well for channels that have "hard" failures. These are hardware failures that permanently remove a channel from service.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

CHANNEL ALLOCATION BASED ON HISTORICAL CHANNEL PERFORMANCE

by Kris Cramer, Joe Shidle and John Garbarino

CURRENT TECHNOLOGY

  In today's system, a channel's health is deter- mined by testing the channel periodically while it is idle and at the beginning and end of each call. These tests help determine if the channel is usable by the system preferably before a call is assigned. When a failure is detected, the channel is taken out of service by the system so it is not used for calls, This method works well for channels that have "hard" failures. These are hardware failures that permanently remove a channel from service.

PROBLEM

  There is another class of problems that cause a channel to malfunction only when it has been used for a while or has a problem undetectable by today's means. An example is a transmitter that fails only after being keyed up for more than fifteen seconds, or a receiver that fades in and out. These "soft" failures can lead to an unreliable system.

SOLUTION

A channel can keep statistics on how many calls ended abnormally. These statistics could then be

used to rank channels for call assignment. For example, a channel has a receiver that seems to be fading in and out. This is not detectable by today's means, but the channel starts logging the fact that calls are ending abnormally. These logs are periodi- cally processed by the channel to look for possible "weaknesses". These weaknesses are used to deter- mine a c...