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Browse Prior Art Database

ASSOCIATING IP ADDRESSES WITH TASKS NOT BOXES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008759D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Vladimir Malesevic: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Obtaining data from an unknown network node -within a small LAN with complex, multi functional nodes. A typical scenario when this problem occurs is when a node, in a local area nehvork of embedded real time systems, is powering up. The node that is powering up does not have any information about the network, there may, or may not, be a server in the network. The powering up node may, or may not, be the only node in the network.

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Technical Developments

ASSOCIATING IP ADDRESSES WITH TASKS NOT BOXES

by Vladimir Malesevic, Kristin Cramer and Jeffrey Shroda

PROBLEM DESCRIPTION

   Obtaining data from an unknown network node -within a small LAN with complex, multi functional nodes. A typical scenario when this problem occurs is when a node, in a local area nehvork of embedded real time systems, is powering up. The node that is powering up does not have any information about the network, there may, or may not, be a server in the network. The powering up node may, or may not, be the only node in the network.

SOLUTION

  Nodes in a LAN usually have a fixed physical address and a fixed IP address. In this case, if some data is stored on one of the nodes and another node is looking for that data, the second node needs to know the first node's IP address in order to send the request for the data. The assumption is that the IP protocol is used.

  Using the IP multicast, one node can have more than one IP address simultaneously. The IP addresses are linked to the tasks that are running on the nodes. This paper describes a procedure for accessing some information without knowing where (on which node) the information is physically store:d, but knowing the IP address of the task that holds the information. The location of the task is unknown; however, it is known that the task participates IP multicast and the multicast IP is known to all nodes in the network.

  Let's assume that there are one or more nodes at the network, each one of them has its own unique IP address. All nodes run in one out of several possible operational modes at a time. Let's focus on only two of thos...