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RADIO SUBSCRIBER DENSITY CONTROL IN SIMULCAST COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008799D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Herbert Richard Wolf: AUTHOR

Abstract

Simulcast communication systems enlarge their coverage area by simultaneously transmitting the same signal from multiple transmitters. These trans- mitters are physically located such that each trans- mitting coverage area slightly overlaps the next transmitting coverage area. To ensure receiving radio units within the overlap areas to receive a cor- rect RF signal, the transmitted RF signal from each transmitter has to be perfectly aligned with each other. Many solutions are available to ensure align- ment, among them most commonly used the Global Positioning Satellite network to assist in the launch time of the transmitted RF signal. This will ensure a very low bit error rate that will allow the radio to accept the reception of the transmission.

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MOlOROLA Technical Developments

RADIO SUBSCRIBER DENSITY CONTROL IN SIMULCAST COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

by Herbert Richard Wolf

BACKGROUND

   Simulcast communication systems enlarge their coverage area by simultaneously transmitting the same signal from multiple transmitters. These trans- mitters are physically located such that each trans- mitting coverage area slightly overlaps the next transmitting coverage area. To ensure receiving radio units within the overlap areas to receive a cor- rect RF signal, the transmitted RF signal from each transmitter has to be perfectly aligned with each other. Many solutions are available to ensure align- ment, among them most commonly used the Global Positioning Satellite network to assist in the launch time of the transmitted RF signal. This will ensure a very low bit error rate that will allow the radio to accept the reception of the transmission.

  In the case that the radio receives the RF signal with a too high of a bit error rate, the radio will not accept the RF signal. Continued bad signal reception will force the radio to leave the coverage area and search a better, more acceptable signal.

available in this area for emergency communica- tions.

  Two controlled methods can be utilized to trig- ger the radio bit error algorithm that will force the radio to leave the current RF area:

The first method is to alter the transmitted

data of the simulcast subsite A-3 by exactly 180

degrees. This will cause radios in sole capture of...