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Browse Prior Art Database

QUIET CHIRP

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008828D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Mark A. Barros: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

As the demand for smaller paging devices increas- es, it is of paramount importance that solutions be pro- cured to consolidate and remove unnecessary hard- ware. Since input devices contribute significantly to the overall size of the pager, it seems appropriate that this area be addressed first.

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MOIOROLA Technical Developments

QUIET CHIRP

by Mark A. Barros and Rami C. Levy

WHAT IS QUIET CHIRP?

ing on the pager's existing motor via software during each key press. The duration of the vibration should be long enough to provide sufficient feedback to the user, yet short enough to avoid slowing down the pager's operation. A vibratory alert duration in the range of l/4 to l/32 seconds is suggested. ADVANTAGES OF QUIET CHIRP

  As the demand for smaller paging devices increas- es, it is of paramount importance that solutions be pro- cured to consolidate and remove unnecessary hard- ware. Since input devices contribute significantly to the overall size of the pager, it seems appropriate that this area be addressed first.

   Current input devices used in the p"ging industry consume precious pager real estate in order to provide the necessary inputs required for operation. The main attraction to traditional buttons is the tactile feedback they provide. Other methods of input, such as "touch screen" and "solid state", require less space, and in some cases may be more desirable, if not for their lack of tactile feedback. Audible key "click" response is one possible solution to this problem, but it prevents the user from discreetly reviewing his or her messages.

  Quiet Chirp eliminates the lack of tactile feedback associated with solid state, touch screen, and certain buttons, by providing the user with a silent, vibratory, "chirp-like" response to key presses. This sho...