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Wireless Position Location Using Two-Tone Signal Distance Measurements and Triangulation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008851D
Publication Date: 2002-Jul-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses a wireless transmitter, at least 3 wireless receivers, and a central computer to measure the physical location of the transmitter relative to the receivers. Benefits include the use of inexpensive RF hardware to measure relative location more accurately than existing technologies (such as GPS).

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Wireless Position Location Using Two-Tone Signal Distance Measurements and Triangulation

Disclosed is a method that uses a wireless transmitter, at least 3 wireless receivers, and a central computer to measure the physical location of the transmitter relative to the receivers. Benefits include the use of inexpensive RF hardware to measure relative location more accurately than existing technologies (such as GPS).

Background

Currently, GPS receivers are costly (approximately $100 each), and these receivers only enable an accuracy of ~100 meters.  Also the GPS solution is very sensitive to channel conditions, thereby reducing the accuracy of the solution.

General Description

The disclosed method processes distance information (obtained from disclosure 24367, Distance Measurements Using a Two-Tone Wireless Signal and a Digital Receiver) to determine the position location of the transmitter relative to the receiver (see Figure 1). This disclosure uses a triangulation method to determine position location.

Description of Operation

After distance measurements are determined, the data is sent to a central computer for processing. The mechanism for sending the data from the receivers to the central computer can be any type of commercial network or data transmission scheme available. 

The central computer contains a digital map showing where each of the receivers are located. When the central computer receives the distance information, it draws concentric circles around each of the rec...