Browse Prior Art Database

PRESSURE SENSITIVE INPUT FOR THREE DIMENSIONAL INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008862D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Bill Foster: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

With the advances in computer technology, including faster processing power and affordable cost, more and more products are taking advantage of presenting a Graphical User Interface to the user. The icons associated with various user features are getting larger to represent the more complicated nature of the features themselves. Features not avail- able in one product can often be found in another, so that increasingly two or more applications are typi- cally running on the screen at the same time.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

PRESSURE SENSITIVE INPUT FOR THREE DIMENSIONAL

INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

by Bill Foster and Malcolm Goddard

BACKGROUND

l

  With the advances in computer technology, including faster processing power and affordable cost, more and more products are taking advantage of presenting a Graphical User Interface to the user. The icons associated with various user features are getting larger to represent the more complicated nature of the features themselves. Features not avail- able in one product can often be found in another, so that increasingly two or more applications are typi- cally running on the screen at the same time.

  Traditional mouse and trackball hardware use yes/no type 'clicks' to select user choices from a screen but do not take advantage of three dimen- sional input as used with pressure sensitive pens and digitizing pads.

- Drop-down combo boxes require several mouse clicks and additional mouse movement to first show the user the choices and then to allow selection.

- Touch screens allow users to interact more directly with controls on a screen but still do not react to variations in the input,

PROBLEM

   Therefore, screens are becoming more and more crowded with icons/information that the user can select/retrieve. The problem is how to present this large amount of information to the user in a way that allows easy access and selection.

Currently there are various methods that give the user access to screen information:

SOLUTION

  The invention described here is a method of using the pressure applied to a mouse or similar pressure sensitive device as a way of accessing a 'stack' of icons/information arranged on a two dimensional screen. As the input pressure is increased, the stack of icons would be traversed and each icon would in succession be made visible to the user. The visible icon could then be selected by releasing the mouse button, The selection could be canceled by moving off of the stack.

0 Mororola. Inc. 1998 130 September 1998

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