Browse Prior Art Database

ROUTE PLANNING AND GUIDANCE INCORPORATING TRAIN SCHEDULES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008902D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 129K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Yilin Zhao: AUTHOR

Abstract

As automatic navigation products become popu- lar, demands for high quality route planning and guidance tools increase. Planning and guidance can be used in a vehicle to direct its occupants to their destinations, used in a hand-held (or laptop) mobile device to achieve the similar purpose, used on the Internet to calculate and display detailed routes to specified destinations, or used in a central host to guide remote users to their respective destinations.

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MO7OROLA Technical Developments

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ROUTE PLANNING AND GUIDANCE INCORPORATING TRAIN SCHEDULES

by Yilin Zhao

INTRODUCTION

  As automatic navigation products become popu- lar, demands for high quality route planning and guidance tools increase. Planning and guidance can be used in a vehicle to direct its occupants to their destinations, used in a hand-held (or laptop) mobile device to achieve the similar purpose, used on the Internet to calculate and display detailed routes to specified destinations, or used in a central host to guide remote users to their respective destinations.

  Besides guiding their users, these planning and guidance devices must provide safe and efficient assistance. One issue is to incorporate train sched- ules into the planning and guidance processes, which is vital to safe railway and roadway cross- ings.

DESCRIPTION

  With advances of computer, information, and communications technologies, modern travelers have many automated tools to assist them. Among these tools, the most noticeable are route planning and route guidance. With route planning, one can receive a maneuver instruction set after providing a destination (and sometimes an origin). With route guidance, one can be directed turn-by-turn to reach the destination. Essentially, these two tools answer the questions of "How can I get there?' and "Which road should I travel to get there?'

  Rome planning and guidance processes need the involvement of a digital map database. Planning requires a map to provide information regarding travel cost and to determine an optimal route for the user. The travel cost could be travel distance, travel time, and travel complexity. To minimize the travel distance, the map must contain road segment length data. To minimize the travel time, the map must

contain road segment length and allowable travel speed on the segment. To minimize the travel com- plexity such as fewer toll booths, fewer left turns, and no expressways, additional data elements are required. Furthermore, data elements are also need- ed for other route selection criteria, which may depend on traffic volumes, scenery roads, in-road facilities, familiarities and superstitions. These data elements are typically stored as attributes in the map database. They are provided to an algorithm during the actual planning phase. One way to solve the potential train and vehicle collision problem or to avoid unnecessary delays is to add the railway crossing information as another attribute in the map database. In addition, the train schedules in the area are also integrated into the map database as profiles. In this way, both route planning and route guidance subsystems can use this information for their execu- tions, See Figure 1 on next page.

  Once the train crossing related information is contained in the map, the system has a variety of approaches to deal with the railway- and roadway- crossing problem....