Browse Prior Art Database

NON-RECHARGEABLE TRANSMIT ENERGY SOLUTION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008916D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Greg Coonley: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

One-way paging has historically relied on its battery life, low cost and small size to distinguish this form of communication from the traditional Land Mobile and Cellular services. With the advent of two-way messaging in the paging services the need to maintain this distinction has become even greater as the capabilities are less distinguishable from the other two-way forms of messaging, but with the addition of the reverse channel the addi- tional HW needed has created cost and size pres- sures that have begged for a unique solution. Included in this HW have been the need for a power solution to address the additional current needed to power the reverse channel.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

NON-RECHARGEABLE TRANSMIT ENERGY SOLUTION

by Greg Coonley, Casey Wimert and Andy Pope

  One-way paging has historically relied on its battery life, low cost and small size to distinguish this form of communication from the traditional Land Mobile and Cellular services. With the advent of two-way messaging in the paging services the need to maintain this distinction has become even greater as the capabilities are less distinguishable from the other two-way forms of messaging, but with the addition of the reverse channel the addi- tional HW needed has created cost and size pres- sures that have begged for a unique solution. Included in this HW have been the need for a power solution to address the additional current needed to power the reverse channel.

  The first commercial 2-way paging products have employed either a unique single battery solu- tion that tends to limit the reduction of size and at the same time are more costly and less available to the consumer, or a replaceable cell with a recharge- able cell that has limited life span, requires addition- al circuitry and adds cost. A third more optimal solution is the use of a primary replaceable cell with a secondary replaceable cell supplying only the cur- rent required to power the low consumption require- ments of the reverse channel.

The non-rechargeable reverse channel energy source has three advantages over the architectures

presently used. Use of a single cell for both fo...