Browse Prior Art Database

GRAPHICAL ALIGNMENT FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATION DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008944D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jul-25
Document File: 6 page(s) / 163K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Bernd Lehr: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A graphical alignment procedure that takes advantage of the widely known and accepted Microsoft Windows user interface can make the alignment of Wireless Communication Devices more user-friendly and intuitive. The amount of documentation required is significantly reduced since no explanation of the alignment data is neces- sary. In some cases external measurement equip- ment can be avoided if the displayed graph shows all relevant details.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

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GRAPHICAL ALIGNMENT FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATION DEVICES

by Bernd Lehr, Egbert Lenger and Klaus Tetz

ABSTRACT PROPOSED SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM(S)

  A graphical alignment procedure that takes advantage of the widely known and accepted Microsoft Windows user interface can make the alignment of Wireless Communication Devices more user-friendly and intuitive. The amount of documentation required is significantly reduced since no explanation of the alignment data is neces- sary. In some cases external measurement equip- ment can be avoided if the displayed graph shows all relevant details.

INTRODUCTION

  The following paper describes how the align- ment of Wireless Communication Devices can be made more user-friendly and intuitive if a graphical alignment procedure is used.

PROBLEM(S) TO BE SOLVED

  Radio Service Software (RSS) is used to align Wireless Communication Devices. Most existing RSS packages offer a poor textual user interface. The alignment procedure is described in short textu-

al terms and alignment data has to be entered very often using numbers meaningless to the user. An example of a textual alignment screen in shown in Figure 1.

  Some modern RSS packages running under Microsoft Windows present the alignment data com- bined with a static picture. The alignment data is selected via combo boxes containing lists of valid data only. The alignment data is still shown as num- bers. The static picture does not reflect any changes done during the alignment process. An example of an alignment screen with a static picture is shown in Figure 2.

  The improved RSS running under Microsoft Windows presents the alignment data as a dynamic graph showing the actual alignment situation. To do this the alignment parameters are measured by the Wireless Communication Device, transferred to the RSS and displayed as a graph on the RSS alignment screen. In addition, the corresponding alignment values are shown beside the graph for information purposes. An example of the initial alignment screen showing the measured graph is shown in Figure 3.

  If the Wireless Communication Device needs alignment the user selects the corresponding part of the graph with the mouse. To change the alignment the user keeps the mouse button pressed and moves the graph until the alignment is correct. Then the user releases the mouse button. Now additional alignment of other parameters can be done using the same procedure. After all alignment is done the user presses the Save button to store the alignment data in the Wireless Communication Device. An example of the alignment screen after the alignment is finished is shown in Figure 4. T...