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Method for an anti-chaffing and shield-grounded coaxial mount

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008963D
Publication Date: 2002-Jul-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for an anti-chaffing and shield-grounded coaxial mount. Benefits include improved functionality and improved cable service life.

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Method for an anti-chaffing and shield-grounded coaxial mount

Disclosed is a method for an anti-chaffing and shield-grounded coaxial mount.  Benefits include improved functionality and improved cable service life.

Background

              Coaxial and other cables are required to connect wireless local area networks (WLANs) and network interface cards (NICs). For many conventional solutions, the coaxial cable must exit the chassis and continue on to the antenna because the antenna does not work well within an electrically closed box. The exiting cable must have an electrical connection to the chassis to shunt current from internally coupled fields and prevent the cable from violating the electromagnetic interference (EMI) integrity of the system. Requirements state that the connection must be cheap, fast, and a nearly 360° without using a separate connector.

              Flexible dampening materials conventionally prevent chaffing.

              Conventional solutions require interposed connectors that restrict the hole size to a very narrow window. These solutions additionally require multiple connectors that increase cost and solution complexity. Ferrite and soldered connections are expensive and fail to recognize that the coaxial shield and the chassis should be connected. Toroids and supplemental connectors (or feed through connectors) require increased complexity.

Description

              The disclosed method is a toothed cable retention mechanism that prevents movement of the cable and provides for grounding the shield of t...