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Method for a grounding mechanism for a computer internal wireless antenna solution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000008965D
Publication Date: 2002-Jul-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a grounding mechanism for a computer internal wireless antenna solution. Benefits include improved functionality and improved ease of implementation.

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Method for a grounding mechanism for a computer internal wireless antenna solution

Disclosed is a method for a grounding mechanism for a computer internal wireless antenna solution. Benefits include improved functionality and improved ease of implementation.

Background

              Conventional antenna mounting options for a computer system do not ground the cable as the coaxial cable passes through the chassis without a connector. The antenna and cable usually go through a slot and extend beyond the chassis (see Figure 1). This approach works for an antenna at its required frequency band. However, unwanted emissions may occur at other frequencies. The noise may be propagated from the circuitries on the board to the cable shield. Because the cable is not grounded to the chassis, the cable radiates like a monopole antenna. The result may cause the computer system to fail the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and International Special Committee on Radio Interference (CISPR) radiated emission regulations. Failure is a problem in the frequencies below 1 GHz due to a tighter regulatory limit. To eliminate/reduce unwanted radiations, design provisions must be included in the antenna solution for grounding the cable shield.

              Conventionally, no grounding mechanisms are provided for the internal antenna solution. As a result, emission problems may occur for computer systems with wireless applications.

              The conventional method of grounding a cable is to have a 360º connection, which requires a feed through connector on the chassis. This approach is expensive and requires modification of the chassis, which is often not acceptable to the computer vendor. Grounding adds manufacturing complexity and may require FCC certification for each type of chassis.

              Various...