Browse Prior Art Database

DETECTION OF TARGET MOBILE SIGNAL STRENGTH

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009024D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Aug-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Andrew Chu: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Many wireless mobile units support a display which provides the user with an indication of the signal strength between the mobile and the cell site serving the mobile. For mobile-to-mobile intercon- nect calls, audio quality is affected not only by the quality of signal between the local mobile and its serving cell site but by inadequate signal strength from the target mobile (or the mobile on the far end) and its corresponding cell site. A convenient and useful feature would enable a mobile to display the signal strength of the far end mobile.

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Technical Developments

DETECTION OF TARGET MOBILE SIGNAL STRENGTH

by Andrew Chu, Glen Daniels and Edwin David

ABSTRACT

  Many wireless mobile units support a display which provides the user with an indication of the signal strength between the mobile and the cell site serving the mobile. For mobile-to-mobile intercon- nect calls, audio quality is affected not only by the quality of signal between the local mobile and its serving cell site but by inadequate signal strength from the target mobile (or the mobile on the far end) and its corresponding cell site. A convenient and useful feature would enable a mobile to display the signal strength of the far end mobile.

PROBLEM DESCRIPTION AND SOLUTION

  With conventional mobile-to-mobile calls over digital infrastructures, there is no easy method to pass signal strength information regarding the far end mobile. As the use of wireless communications has increased, many equipment vendors have creat- ed schemes to eliminate the need for the Transcoder to process (compress and uncompress) audio when it is determined that the calls involve two mobiles
(e.g. Motorola's iDEN Transcoder Bypass). This process is used to improve the audio quality by eliminating one cycle of audio processing during mobile-to-mobile calls. When these schemes are in place, only a subset of the bandwidth allotted for transporting audio is required since only compressed

audio and not PCM formatted audio is passed between Transcoder devices. Signal strength can, therefore, be delivered using remaining bits that are not used in the scheme.

  Figure 1 shows an example of how this scheme can be used within the iDEN infrastructure. T...