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Micronized Polyetherimide Thermoplastic Powders

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009030D
Publication Date: 2002-Aug-01

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IPCOM000009029D: IP.COM

Abstract

Polyetherimides, a class of high-performance engineering thermoplastics, are finding increasing utility in applications traditionally associated with thermosetting polymers, such as epoxies and unsaturated polyimides. This paper contains a discussion of this trend. The authors conclude that the availability of polyetherimide in micronized powder form should accelerate the adoption of this polymer class into advanced composites and coatings.

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Micronized Polyetherimide Thermoplastic Powders

Michael A Vallance and Alexey Kruglov

Introduction

Polyetherimides, a class of high-performance engineering thermoplastics, are finding increasing utility in applications traditionally associated with thermosetting polymers, such as epoxies and unsaturated polyimides.  This paper contains a discussion of this trend.  The authors conclude that the availability of polyetherimide in micronized powder form should accelerate the adoption of this polymer class into advanced composites and coatings.

Polyetherimides

Polyetherimide engineering thermoplastic materials find utilization in a wide range of extrusion and injection molding applications.  This family of polymers forms amorphous plastics with high glass transition temperatures (Tg), high strength, and solubility in selected polar solvents.  These polymers find applications in many industries including microelectronics, power electronics, lighting, transportation, and medical equipment.

Selected properties for a typical polyetherimide, UltemÒ1000 resin[1], include:

Property

Nominal Value

Test Method

Specific Gravity

1.27

ASTM D792

Tensile Modulus

520,000 psi

ASTM D638

Tensile Strength @ Yield

16,000 psi

ASTM D638

Tensile Elongation @ Yield

7.0%

ASTM D638

Tensile Elongation @ Break

60%

ASTM D638

Notched Izod Impact (73°F)

1.00 ft-lb/in

ASTM D256

Rockwell Hardness (M-scale)

109

ASTM D785

Tg

425°F

DSC, 36°F/min

DTUL @ 66 psi (0.25 in)

410°F

ASTM D648

Dielectric Strength (in Air, 0.062 in)

831 V/mil

ASTM D149

Dielectric Constant (1 kHz)

3.150

ASTM D150

Dissipation Factor (1 kHz / 2 GHz)

0.0012 / 0.0025

ASTM D150

Flame Rating (0.016 in)

V-0

UL 94

UltemÒ 1000 resin’s chemical repeat structure has been reported as:

Polyetherimides, while useful without modification, have also found utility when modified with a broad variety of fillers, including mineral and carbon fibers, milled minerals, graphite, and micronized polytetrafluoroethylene.  Inclusion of appropriate fillers enhances strength, modulus, thermal and electrical conductivity, wear resistance, and/or lubricity.  Pigmentation is also an option.

Polyetherimides in Advanced Composites

Advanced organic-matrix composites; based on highly aligned, continuous fibers such as carbon fibers derived from polyacrylonitrile or mesophase petroleum pitch, E glass, S glass, quartz, alumina, polyaramid, and other high-strength, high-modulus, low-density fibers; are valued for their high specific strength and high specific modulus.  Specific strength and specific modulus are the ratios of strength and modulus to density.  As an example, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites, which have strength and stiffness similar to aluminum alloys, achieve this performance with specific gravity of ca 1.5 versus2.7 for aluminum.  Due to the high performance of these materials, they find application in a host of dynamic applications, including fixed wing aircraft, helicopters, missiles, space vehicles and satellites, high-speed industrial...