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Method for a Braille feedback keyboard

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009256D
Publication Date: 2002-Aug-13
Document File: 3 page(s) / 260K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a Braille feedback keyboard. Benefits include improved user productivity, and improved functionality.

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Method for a Braille feedback keyboard

Disclosed is a method for a Braille feedback keyboard. Benefits include improved user productivity, and improved functionality.

Background

        � � � � � Conventional solutions include a range of software and hardware products for impaired users. One system makes use of a pad of push-up pins. By resting his or her hand upon the pad of pins, the user receives a constant stream of output from a computer. The computer interprets the text on-screen and sends the data to the device, where the user receives feedback from the push-up pin pad. This device is not directly related to keyboards or input.

        � � � � � Another conventional solution is the Braille strip that blind users can lay in front of a keyboard. The strip produces Braille symbols one row at a time while the user's fingers rest on the strip. This is a separate peripheral with separate setup and usage criteria.

Description

        � � � � � The disclosed method is a device that provides Braille characters on a keyboard using dynamically actuated pins. The sightless user is able to type by feel read from the keys. Pin configurations can be changed on the default position keys, providing a row of text to the user.

        � � � � � For example, a blind person chats with someone online. The user types a message and uses a control key to activate read mode on the keys where her fingers rest. A second key activates the next line of characters, and the two control keys navigate through the entire body of text.

        � � � � � All passive keys have fixed, standard Braille features for appropriate characters (see Figure 1). Active keys each have a set of six actua...