Dismiss
InnovationQ/InnovationQ Plus content will be updated on Sunday, June 25, 10am ET, with new patent and non-patent literature collections. Click here to learn more.
Browse Prior Art Database

RFID Tags for Self-Service Terminals

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009317D
Publication Date: 2002-Aug-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

These inventions relate to RFID tags, or similar wireless tags, for use in a self-service terminal such as an ATM, or in a module for use in a self-service terminal. Such modules include Bunch note accept modules, cheque processing modules, currency recycling modules, and such like. The RFID modules are used to counteract fraud, improve security, improve module operation, improve detection of sheets, and such like.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 38% of the total text.

These inventions relate to RFID tags, or similar wireless tags, for use in a self-service terminal such as an ATM, or in a module for use in a self-service terminal.  Such modules include Bunch note accept modules, cheque processing modules, currency recycling modules, and such like.

Note Depository using RF tags

In an ATM or other self-service terminal, note depositories require the user to input notes to be recognized and validated either singly (which is time consuming) or as a bunch which is mechanically separated into single notes for recognition and validation. This invention relates to a mechanism for the deposit of banknotes (and other valuable media) containing RFID tags (or other wireless tags) which do not require the handling described above.

Valuable documents exist at present which contain RFID labels. By 2005 the ECB (European Central Bank) propose to have bank notes with RFID tags. These devices allow simple depositories to be made instead of the large, expensive and mechanically complex systems used today. Working in similar fashion to a night safe, the bundle of RFID containing documents are dropped or otherwise moved into a bin (made of plastics, metal, or any other convenient material) that has an integrated RFID reader. All documents are read without any mechanical separation. The value of the documents is displayed to the depositor who can decide to accept or reject the deposit. If rejected, the bundle is returned. If accepted the account can then be updated and the bundle of notes dropped (or otherwise moved) into a storage bin. Subsequently the bundle can be sorted mechanically or manually. If there are any anomalies with the notes the tag can be traced to the source and appropriate action taken.

As stated above, many systems exist that accept documents for processing (e.g. from manufacturers such as: Glory, GD, BEB, ASCOM, etc – all trade marks of the respective companies) but all require mechanical apparatus for handling the deposit if automatic reading is performed.

This solution exploits the advantages offered by RFID. The mechanics required to perform depositing of documents with RFID tags is much simpler as no movement or separation is required. Hence the deposit can be much faster with less chance of mechanical failure.

RFID-based document security

Cash in transit, ATM and other systems employ security devices whereby attempted unauthorized access to the valuable media results in the evacuation of a container of dye to stain the media such that it can be easily identified as media that has undergone that process. It does not render the media unusable and it sometimes fails to comprehensively stain the media. Hence acquiring such media can still be lucrative for the thief and the loss of the media is still a loss to the legitimate owner. Alternatives to stop the thief getting the media could involve destroying the media but the owner then has the problem of proving the value of what has been destroyed. Such a s...