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VIRTUAL BACKGROUND

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009337D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Aug-16
Document File: 4 page(s) / 223K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Peter M. Drozt: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

As more people are working from home and as more people are on the go because of work, taking business telephony or dispatch calls outside of the office is very common. This means when a person is talking on the phone / subscriber unit, the back- ground noises being heard are not sounds conducive to effective communication, but they are sounds from wherever the person happens to be. For exam- ple, office sounds such as computer keyboards and/or silence are not heard. Rather, the sounds of airports, conversations, PA systems, television, or children are heard instead. These background sounds can be very distracting to the person on the other end of the call.

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Developments Technical 0 M MOTOROLA

VIRTUAL BACKGROUND

by Peter M. Drozt, Jennifer A. Pierce and Marybeth J. Whitehurst

PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED

  As more people are working from home and as more people are on the go because of work, taking business telephony or dispatch calls outside of the office is very common. This means when a person is talking on the phone / subscriber unit, the back- ground noises being heard are not sounds conducive to effective communication, but they are sounds from wherever the person happens to be. For exam- ple, office sounds such as computer keyboards and/or silence are not heard. Rather, the sounds of airports, conversations, PA systems, television, or children are heard instead. These background sounds can be very distracting to the person on the other end of the call.

THE INVENTION

  Existing technology provides the capability to reduce background noise during a dispatch or cellu- lar call. This idea expands the current technology by allowing a dispatch central controller or a tele- phone switch to combine a person's voice with a chosen background sound, based upon the identity of the other party involved in the call. For example, if a subscriber has the virtual background feature provisioned, office sounds may be the background his business associates hear, but his friends and fam- ily might hear something more fun, such as music.

  To clarify, imagine an architect working at a construction site, talking on hisiher subscriber unit about some requirements for a new building with the builder. The architect is trying to explain these requirements to the builder and the bulldozer on site starts. With virtual background invoked, all the builder hears is the contractor's voice and the builder's chosen background sound. During the

same call, suppose the builder is caught off guard at another job where his employees are using loud power tools. The builder wants to make sure the architect can hear him clearly and he wants to have background sounds more conducive to clear com- munication - so he has the system provisioned to play the architect's favorite music as they discuss the construction requirements of their pending busi- ness contract.

  In summary, this idea encompasses the following:

(1) the ability of a central controller to store back- ground sounds, including silence

(2) for a given subscriber, the ability to provision a particular background sound for each individual with whom the subscriber communicates

(3) for those not listed in (2), the ability to have a default background sound

(4) the ability of a central controller to identify the other party involved in the call and associate a back- ground sound with that other party

(5) the ability of the central controller to play the background sound and overlay the person's voice on top of that sound.

  In order to better explain this idea, the remain- der of this paper describes provisioning of the virtu- al background feature, shows modifications to a typ- ic...