Browse Prior Art Database

MODE DETERMINATION FOR TALKGROUP SERVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009345D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Aug-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 145K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jim Edkins: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Motorola's private trunked systems deploy a system-wide network management system to con- figure and monitor the system. One of the functions of this system to configure services for the end user. The configuration allows the network administrator, among many options, to disable and enable talk- group services, change the operating mode of the talkgroup, etc. Changing these modes are done at the management system and remain static and only change if the user changes them at the management system.

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@ MOTOROLA Technical Developments

  MODE DETERMINATION FOR TALKGROUP SERVICES :

by Jim Edkins, Milena Sukovic and Maher Hasan

BACKGROUND

  Motorola's private trunked systems deploy a system-wide network management system to con- figure and monitor the system. One of the functions of this system to configure services for the end user. The configuration allows the network administrator, among many options, to disable and enable talk- group services, change the operating mode of the talkgroup, etc. Changing these modes are done at the management system and remain static and only change if the user changes them at the management system.

  Thus, to change the operating mode of the ser- vice, the user must first make the change at the net- work management system.

PROBLEM

  The problem is that the talkgroup services are pre-configured at the manager. There may be a need to dynamically change the mode of the service for one call or for a short duration of time and return the talkgroup back to its configured mode.

  The ability to change the mode of talkgroup from the subscriber itself "on the fly" is the specific issue being addressed by this article.

  The example being used in this article is a ser- vice called broadcast call. This is an APCO Project 25 service which allows for one-way dispatch trans- missions, either from a radio or console dispatcher, without intemrptions and without call back. Several talkgroup configuration changes are required to implement the service. The article addresses a method to make the change to ANY talkgroup, not only one pre-configured at the manager.

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SOLUTION

  Any talkgroup can be dynamically changed to operate in broadcast mode. In a means other than asserting the PIT the user requests a talkgroup be temporarily established to function as a broadcast teleservice. The fixed end initiates a timer if the user is authorized to establish this service change. In addition, the fixed end transmits frequent mes- sages on the control channel indicating the talk- group service has been changed for broadcast opera- tion. This is done to ensme the radios will operate in broadcast mode once a; grant is seen for this talk- group. When the timer expires, the control channel messages are terminated and all monitoring radios assume the talkgroup has returned to standard operation.

The process is:

  1. User requests to change the mode of the talk- group. This is done on the control channel.

  2. A response is sent back to initiator granting or denying the mode change request.

  3. If granted, a special update message is sent out over the control c...