Browse Prior Art Database

CHASSIS CONTROL SYSTEM TO INTERFACE SENSORS AND ELECTRONIC CONTROL UNITS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009485D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Aug-28
Document File: 8 page(s) / 357K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Ross Bannatyne: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

As the number and complexity of sensors and electronic control units in automobiles continues to rise, the difficulty in effectively integrating the elec- tronic systems grows. This paper outlines a chassis control system architecture intended to case the interfacing of sensors to the Electronic Control Units (ECUs) used in automotive chassis control systems.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

@

CHASSIS CONTROL SYSTEM TO INTERFACE SENSORS

AND ELECTRONIC CONTROL UNITS

by Ross Bannatyne and Kevin Klein

  This continued increase in the number of sen- sors will present several new problems to the system integration. Each of these sensors currently has a unique analog interface. Some provide DC volt- ages, some supply varying currents, others may pro- vide a pulse train of varying frequency and ampli- tude. These unique analog interfaces increase the complexity of the ECU and make it very difficult to easily add new sensors to the system. Also, the unique signal provided by the sensors requires that specialized, expensive wiring be run throughout the vehicle to connect the sensors to the ECU. This wiring adds significantly to the vehicle assembly cost and final weight, and is a leading cause of war- ranty and service costs.

  The integration of many sensors also will increase the complexity of the control algorithm of the chassis control systems. As no intelligence exists at the sensor, typically a stream of informa- tion is presented to the controller which must handle this information in real time. As the number of sen- sors increases, arbitrating these events becomes more problematic as bandwidth becomes more lim- ited.

  One of the rising trends in chassis control sys- tems is the number of functions that can be shared between the systems. An example of this would be the steering angle detection. The steering angle is required by electric power steering systems but is also required by vehicle stability systems which need to know in which direction the driver intends to go.

  Today's chassis control systems swap this infor- mation via a network bus such as CAN or J1850, requiring ECU-ECU communication which inter- rupts the operation of each ECU. As the number of sensors integrated continues to grow, the ECUs themselves will become information bottlenecks as

0 MOlLmh, 1°C. ,999 137 September 1999

ABSTRACT

  As the number and complexity of sensors and electronic control units in automobiles continues to rise, the difficulty in effectively integrating the elec- tronic systems grows. This paper outlines a chassis control system architecture intended to case the interfacing of sensors to the Electronic Control Units (ECUs) used in automotive chassis control systems.

INTRODUCTION

  The safety, performance and efficiency of today's automobile is made possible by the ever increasing amount of electronic functionality incor- porated in the vehicle. As new uses for electronics are identified, many mechanical functions are elimi- nated or replaced, and new functions never before possible are created (e.g. vehicle stability control).

  This ever increasing use of electronics and asso- ciated sensors is beginning to strain the capability of today's communications and systems architectures. For example, an anti-lock brake system (ABS) in production today might utilize four wheel speed sensors to determine the rate of...