Browse Prior Art Database

ABUSE LEVEL INDICATOR IN PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009549D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Sep-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 141K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Anthony Dolezal: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In today's world of higher end information elec- tronic devices the LCD are getting larger in size and the opportunity for the LCD fracturing in a drop sit- uation is occurring at a higher rate. People are used to the older LCD sizes (smaller) that could be designed with sufficient reliable design margins to survive severe drop conditions. Currently there is no method to collect or store data to indicate the abuse level received by an electronic device for warranty purposes, nor is there a method for the end user to be subliminally educated to reduce the abuse imparted to the electronic device. Therefore the abil- ity to monitor and record customer abuse to personal electronic devices is an ongoing problem.

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Developments Technical 0 M MOTOROLA

  ABUSE LEVEL INDICATOR IN PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

by Anthony Dolezal, Mark Zaveso and Thomas J. Rollins

INTRODUCTION

  In today's world of higher end information elec- tronic devices the LCD are getting larger in size and the opportunity for the LCD fracturing in a drop sit- uation is occurring at a higher rate. People are used to the older LCD sizes (smaller) that could be designed with sufficient reliable design margins to survive severe drop conditions. Currently there is no method to collect or store data to indicate the abuse level received by an electronic device for warranty purposes, nor is there a method for the end user to be subliminally educated to reduce the abuse imparted to the electronic device. Therefore the abil- ity to monitor and record customer abuse to personal electronic devices is an ongoing problem.

  To solve this problem a method would be required to measure, record and store, and feedback to assist in abuse information feedback of the end user (and warranty centers) indicating different lev- els of potential abuse incurred. The stored data is to be ultimately used by the warranty service centers for field performance tracking and studies of abuse level received.

SOLUTION

  In order to help design reliable LCD assembly systems, it would be helpful to identify a drop level trend history from the electronic communication devices. As a by-product for the severity drop level information gathered by the electronic device, is the opportunity to subliminally educate the end user to the abuse level felt by the device.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

  When a device is dropped, a sensor, shown in Figure 1, generates a voltage signal. The Signal Management IC picks up the voltage signal and the peak voltage is recorded and forwarded to a micro- processor (micro - P). The micro - P contains a software routine used to determine the drop severity. In this example, four categories of abuse levels for the drop height severity are defined as:

  3.0-ft to 4.0-ft drop height is to be considered as mild with no defined abuse level

4.0-ft to 5.0-ft drop height is to be considered as

a minor abuse level

  5.0-ft to 6.0-ft drop height is to be considered as a major abuse level

  6.0-ft to max drop height is to be considered as a catastrophic abuse level

e MOtmh, Inc. ,999 243 September 1999

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Developments Technical 0 M MOToRolA -

  Once the abuse level is determined by the SW information in memory and b) displays the informa- routine the micro-P does two actions, a) stores the tion on the LCD Screen for end user interaction.

Drop Signal

Sensor - Management d

Fig. 1

  For the first action, the micro-P defines which of the four categories to record the drop occurrence. The memory records the total number of occurrences for each category. Thus the pager records a his- togram of the device abuse level. This information is then accessed by the Warranty Ser...