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Method for an on-chip RF CMOS global clock transmitter and receiver

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009611D
Publication Date: 2002-Sep-04
Document File: 5 page(s) / 316K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

CHAIYUTH CHANSUNGSAN: INVENTOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for an on-chip radio frequency (RF) CMOS global clock transmitter and receiver. Benefits include improved functionality,improved performance, and reduced chips’ power consumption

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Method for an on-chip RF CMOS global clock transmitter and receiver

Disclosed is a method for an on-chip radio frequency (RF) CMOS global clock transmitter and receiver. Benefits include improved functionality,improved performance, and reduced chips’ power consumption

Background

� � � � � As microprocessors’ clock frequencies increase, the conventional integrated circuit bus system encounters more severe and prohibitive problems, including:

·        Clock-generation power consumption

·        Losses, such as skin effect and via radiation

·        Signal integrity problems, such as skew and jitter

        � � � � � Conventionally, RF CMOS transceivers are typically used for wireless communication off-chip.

� � � � � � Clock trees and clock drivers conventionally transmit the clock signal using T-line busses. They typically have large parasitic capacitances and require buffer stages with load capacitances.

The result is conductor loss and proximity effect. Power consumption increases as frequencies increase, as do design and layout time.

Description

        � � � � � The disclosed method is an RF CMOS global clock transmitter and receiver. The method includes an on-chip current-mode fully differential RF CMOS transmitter, an on-chip fully differential RF CMOS receiver, and their antennas (such as dipole antennas, see Figure 1). The transmitter is driven by a differential GHz clock signal at its inputs, generating the GHz differential output currents at its dipole-antenna load. The dipole antenna radiates the electromagnetic-wave signal across the die. A receiver, at a distance away on the die, amplifies the small clock signal picked up from its dipole antenna. The full-swing output clock signal can then be distributed to registers, flip-flops, and latches in the proximity. A number of receivers at different locations across the die can be used to provide the clock signal.

        � � � � � The antennas can be (but are not limited to) dipole antennas. The transmitter’s antenna is located on the package’s nearest-to-the-die metal layer (for example, 5F layer of a 10-layer package). The receiver’s antennas are located on the top metal layer of the die (for example, the M6 metal layer of the die) and are oriented in the same direction as that of the transmitter’s antenna (see Figure 2). The locations of the receiver’s antennas on the die can be strategically chosen in order to have maximum fields.� This can be done by 3-D electromagnetic simulations.

        � � � � � The trans...