Browse Prior Art Database

SLOW TURN-AROUND IN TEST SYSTEM RECONFIGURATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009657D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Sep-09
Document File: 5 page(s) / 177K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Gerard Donnelly: AUTHOR

Abstract

The problem I found was in the setting up of test bays, where a number of pieces of test equipment are gathered together and controlled by a PC via a HPIB (interface) card. The equipment used can vary from loads, meters, switches to power supplies etc. When under computer control these pieces of test equipment are connected through a switching device (switch control unit).

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Page 1 of 5

0 M MOTOROLA Technical Developments

SLOW TURN-AROUND IN TEST SYSTEM RECONFIGURATION

by Gerard Donnelly

ucts change and design modifications are made to the units under test; so too the wire loom and the PC's software must change to accommodate the new items. To change from one product to an entirely different one the wire loom must also change.

                                  In terms of changing the wire loom this can be very time consuming and very prone to errors and what generally happens is a number of looms of dif- ferent rev's over a period of time for that one prod- uct. To make matters worse any form of marking wears off or falls off leading to no one being able to determine what loom is the correct rev for that prod- uct. The following diagram is a typical wiring dia- gram that makes up a wire loom (Figure 1).
the unit under test through ;he wire loom. As prod- -

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PROBLEM

  The problem I found was in the setting up of test bays, where a number of pieces of test equipment are gathered together and controlled by a PC via a HPIB (interface) card. The equipment used can vary from loads, meters, switches to power supplies etc. When under computer control these pieces of test equipment are connected through a switching device (switch control unit).

  From the switching device a wire loom is con- nected to the test head of the piece of equipment. The switching device under computer control deter- mines which item of test eauiument is connected to

Fig. 1

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0 M MO-LA Technical Developments

  My answer to the problem of time consuming wire loom manufacture, confusion between wire loom rev's and time taken in swapping looms into and out of test bays, is to have a universal wire loom that can be simply, quickly and easily changed. This will ensure reducing down time incurred changing the test station and confusion between current and old wire loom rev's

SOLUTION

  My method of thought is as follows: - Only a certain number of pieces of test equipment are con- nected together in any configuration; at any one time to test a certain Motorola unit under test, and all of these items can be connected or looped, through the switching unit. Therefore the items can be coMected or looped, through the switching unit. Therefore the items of test equipment and switching unit can have a standard wire loom. This wire loom on the way to the test head is terminated in a con- nector; in our case an AMP XX way connector. After the wire loom termination at the amp comet- tor is where it gets messy. All the interconnections and extra active and passive components are insert- ed into a fixture box, this connects the wire loom termination to the test head. This fixture box is

where the idea I have come up with comes into play.

  Instead of several different looms, for each rev of test software and product, why not have a PCB connected inside the fiiture box. This has the fol- lowing advantages:

1...