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THE USE OF MICROIMPULSE RADARS FOR WINDOW ANTI-PINCH PROTECTION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009662D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Sep-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Darren Schumacher: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the area of automotive body electronics,"win- dow anti-pinch" regulations are becoming more and more important to our customers. Specifically, a competitive advantage can be gamed if one can pro- vide a system which detects window blockage and prevents the object from being caught in the win- dow. Current systems involve actually waiting for a pinch to occur and noting the increase in motor cur- rent, then backing off the window. Other systems use infrared sensors to detect an object blocking the window.

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0 M MO7-OROLA Technical Developments

THE USE OF MICROIMPULSE RADARS FOR

WINDOW ANTI-PINCH PROTECTION

by Darren Schumacher

  In the area of automotive body electronics,"win- dow anti-pinch" regulations are becoming more and more important to our customers. Specifically, a competitive advantage can be gamed if one can pro- vide a system which detects window blockage and prevents the object from being caught in the win- dow. Current systems involve actually waiting for a pinch to occur and noting the increase in motor cur- rent, then backing off the window. Other systems use infrared sensors to detect an object blocking the window.

  The current sensor based systems are. very use- liable, however, and the motor current method relies on actually pinching something before the system reacts. In any case, something must actually break the plane of the window in order to cause the system to react.

  The solution to the problem is to use the new micro-power impulse radar (MIR) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories and available for Licensing to sense occupant motion in the plane immediately between the occupant and the window.

  A simple predictor algorithm can stop window motion in the event that an object breaks the plane of interest and appears to be about to break the plane of the window. That is, objects can be detected at a distance from the "pinch plane" of the window, and the window can be stopped before a pinch actually occms.

  Note that further advantage...