Browse Prior Art Database

COMMUNICATING MULTIMEDIA TERMINAL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009672D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Sep-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 104K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Andrew Aftelak: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A high-speculation communicating multimedia dumb terminal which is personalizable and able to execute any applications using a generic operating system. Such terminals could be located in public places, e.g. libraries, railway stations, or available for rental/at low cost.

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Technical MOTVROLA @ Developments

COMMUNICATING MULTIMEDIA TERMINAL

by Andrew Aftelak and David Williams

ABSTRACT

  A high-speculation communicating multimedia dumb terminal which is personalizable and able to execute any applications using a generic operating system. Such terminals could be located in public places, e.g. libraries, railway stations, or available for rental/at low cost.

INTRODUCTION

  Today's communications devices and terminals tend to be owned by the user. These devices are arranged to function even in their basic delivered state, despite being programmable. Examples of such devices are mobile phones, personal digital assistants, personal computers or other high value items.

  A possible paradigm for the future is one that embraces the notion that value resides in informa- tion, and that there may be a new breed of terminal device which is a simple enabler for the expression and manipulation of that information.

PROBLEMS TO BE SOLVED

  The profusion of services that will be available over ubiquitous and high capacity wireless networks will be limited by the processing and display capa- bilities of subscriber devices. Those end-users that can afford high-tier terminals will be able to use many more services, leaving those who cannot afford these devices disenfranchised. A method is required to provide high-end generic terminals to all. The added value to the user would then he not in the terminal hardware but in the services and information quality that can be offered.

  Once a terminal has been provided, the termi- nal's effectiveness depends on its ability to allow users to obtain the information they require and

allow them to use their preferred applications. Today, the use of personal preferences can be accommodated in a limited form in WWW search engines, but is kept in the network or on the local machine. Smart cards provide storage of personal information but this is used with a fully functional device, e.g. an electronic wallet, personal digital assistant (PDA).

PR...