Browse Prior Art Database

DATA ENTRY USING SINGLE INPUT TO ASSIST DISADVANTAGED USERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009676D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Sep-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Bob End: AUTHOR

Abstract

Information is fed sequentially to the user of an electronic device. The information comprises large icons of text, digits, symbols or sounds with enhanced intelligibility. A user can then more easily recognize the correct input required to select a par- ticular menu item.

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Technical MO-OLA @ Developments

 DATA ENTRY USING SINGLE INPUT TO ASSIST DISADVANTAGED USERS

by Bob End

ABSTRACT

  Information is fed sequentially to the user of an electronic device. The information comprises large icons of text, digits, symbols or sounds with enhanced intelligibility. A user can then more easily recognize the correct input required to select a par- ticular menu item.

INTRODUCTION

  This paper describes improvements in the method for menu navigation and data entry or elec- tronic devices, such as two-way radios and cellular telephones.

PROBLEMS TO BE SOLVED

  Some conventional menus, keypads and key- boards require good eyesight, reading ability, manu- al dexterity and mental skills to operate. Persons lacking one or more of these skills may find operat- ing such equipment difticult.

PROPOSED SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEMS

  Information is fed to the user sequentially, for example by means of scrolling, as large icons of

text, digits or symbols presented on a display. Alternatively, sequential sounds may be used. The sequential nature of the presentation simplifies the 'information transfer' to the user. Also, for exam- ple, large icons serve to help the visually impaired.

  If the information were scrolled, then the user would need to press a button or alternative input when the correct information was in the correct position on the screen. It would be easy for the user to press a single nominated button or alternative input, for example make a sound, when the...