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Using a Battery-Based Wakeup Mechanism to Enter a Deeper Power Suspend State (S4) to Prevent Data Loss

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009704D
Publication Date: 2002-Sep-11
Document File: 3 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses a battery-based wakeup mechanism for laptop computers to transition to a deeper suspend state to prevent data in memory from being lost. Benefits include saving battery power.

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Using a Battery-Based Wakeup Mechanism to Enter a Deeper Power Suspend State (S4) to Prevent Data Loss

Disclosed is a method that uses a battery-based wakeup mechanism for laptop computers to transition to a deeper suspend state to prevent data in memory from being lost. Benefits include saving battery power.

Background

Currently, when the OS on a laptop times out (due to idleness), the system is placed into a Suspend to RAM (S3) state, which allows the user to quickly resume work when he or she is ready. If the laptop is running on a battery, it is possible to consume the entire battery capacity in the S3 state, with no energy remaining to power the memory and save any current work. When the user connects the laptop to an AC outlet to power on, the system resumes without the previous work being saved.

General Description

The disclosed method enables content to be preserved in memory by transitioning to a Suspend to Disk (S4) state when the battery capacity falls below an x% (for example: below 15%).

Figure 1 shows the initialization of the Embedded Controller (EC) for wakeup from the suspended state. Figure 2 shows the S3 to S4 state after wakeup from the EC.

Advantages

Some implementations of the disclosed structure and method provide one or more of the following advantages:

The disclosed method allows the system to transition into a deeper suspend state (S4), where data is prevented from being lost.

Fig. 1

Fig. 2

Disclosed anonymously