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Problem Description: Reasons For Performing Context Transfers Between Nodes in an IP Access Network (RFC3374)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009754D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Sep-17
Document File: 15 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Kempf: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In IP access networks that support host mobility, the routing paths between the host and the network may change frequently and rapidly. In some cases, the host may establish certain context transfer candidate services on subnets that are left behind when the host moves. Examples of such services are Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA), header compression, and Quality of Service (QoS). In order for the host to obtain those services on the new subnet, the host must explicitly re-establish the service by performing the necessary signaling flows from scratch. In some cases, this process would considerably slow the process of establishing the mobile host on the new subnet. An alternative is to transfer information on the existing state associated with these services, or context, to the new subnet, a process called "context transfer". This document discusses the desirability of context transfer for facilitating seamless IP mobility.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 10% of the total text.

Network Working Group                                      J. Kempf, Ed.

Request for Comments: 3374                                September 2002

Category: Informational

     Problem Description: Reasons For Performing Context Transfers

                 Between Nodes in an IP Access Network

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does

   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this

   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2002).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   In IP access networks that support host mobility, the routing paths

   between the host and the network may change frequently and rapidly.

   In some cases, the host may establish certain context transfer

   candidate services on subnets that are left behind when the host

   moves.  Examples of such services are Authentication, Authorization,

   and Accounting (AAA), header compression, and Quality of Service

   (QoS).  In order for the host to obtain those services on the new

   subnet, the host must explicitly re-establish the service by

   performing the necessary signaling flows from scratch.  In some

   cases, this process would considerably slow the process of

   establishing the mobile host on the new subnet.  An alternative is to

   transfer information on the existing state associated with these

   services, or context, to the new subnet, a process called "context

   transfer".  This document discusses the desirability of context

   transfer for facilitating seamless IP mobility.

Kempf                        Informational                      [Page 1]

RFC 3374           Context Transfer Problem Statement     September 2002

Table of Contents

   1.0   Introduction................................................2

   2.0   Reference Definitions.......................................3

   3.0   Scope of the Context Transfer Problem.......................3

   4.0   The Need for Context Transfer...............................4

   4.1   Fast Context Transfer-candidate Service Re-establishment....4

   4.1.1 Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA).........4

   4.1.2 Header Compression..........................................5

   4.1.3 Quality of Service (QoS)....................................6

   4.2   Interoperability............................................6

   5.0   Limitations on Context Transfer.............................7

   5.1   Router Compatibility........................................7

   5.2   Requirement to Re-initialize Service from Scratch...........7

   5.3   Suitability for the Particular Service......................7

   5.4   Layer 2 Solutions Better....................................7

   6.0   Performance Considerations..................................8

   7....