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Method of colouring porous material

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009818D
Publication Date: 2002-Sep-20

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present publication relates to a method of colouring porous material, especially human hair, which method comprises applying to the material being coloured, in any desired order successively, or simultaneously, a) a capped diazonium compound and b) a water-soluble coupling component under conditions such that, initially, coupling does not take place, and then causing the capped diazonium compound present on the material to react with the coupling component.

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Method of colouring porous material

The present publication relates to a method of colouring porous material, for example metal, wood or keratin-containing fibres, especially human hair, using developing dyes, that is to say dyes which are formed inside the pores of the substrate.

Colouring with the aid of developing dyes has been known for a long time and has also been generally used for dyeing cotton. The dyes and the colouring methods used therefore do not, however, provide satisfactory results for colouring hair.

For colouring hair, therefore, oxidation dyes are used in most cases; however, they too are not capable of satisfying all requirements. The fastness to washing properties are often inadequate and, in addition, the colouring conditions required often cause a greater or lesser amount of damage to the hair. There has therefore been a need for a colouring method which does not have the mentioned disadvantages or which has them to an insignificant degree.

The present publication relates to a method of colouring porous material, which comprises applying to the material being coloured, in any desired order successively, or simultaneously,


a) a capped diazonium compound and
b) a water-soluble coupling component under conditions such that, initially, coupling does not take place, and then causing the capped diazonium compound present on the material to react with the coupling component.

The colorations obtained are distinguished by outstanding fastness to washing properties, which are significantly better than in the case of colorations with oxidation dyes, and there is virtually no damage to the hair. Moreover, there is no staining of the scalp, because the dye components do not penetrate into the skin and non-fixed dye can be washed off readily.

Suitable capped diazonium compounds include, for example, antidiazoates of formula

A

N

N

O (1),

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diazosulfonates of formula

triazenes of formula

and also cyclic triazenes of formula

or

N

N

A

SO3- (2),

N

R

N

(3)

A

N

B

N

O

N

N

A (4)

B

N

N

NSO2

A (5).

B

In formulae (1) to (5): A is an unsubstituted or substituted aromatic or heterocyclic residue, B is an unsubstituted or substituted, water-soluble aliphatic or aromatic residue and R is hydrogen, or an unsubstituted or substituted aliphatic residue, wherein at least one of the groups must contain a radical imparting water solubility.

Suitable radicals imparting water solubility include, for example, SO3H, COOH, OH or a quaternised ammonium radical of formula

N R2

R1

R3

+ An _ (6),

                                          wherein R1, R2 and R3 are each independently of the others unsubstituted or substituted alkyl and An is an anion.

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R is an a liphatic residue which is an unsubstituted linear or branched C1-C6alkyl or a linear or branched C1-C6alkyl, which is substituted by one or more identical or different substituent sel...