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IMPROVED ACCESS METHOD TO A CELLULAR BASE SITE DIAGNOSTIC UNIT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009901D
Original Publication Date: 2000-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Sep-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jon St. Clair: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Current service providers, specifically the site service technician and supervisors that use Motorola cellular or PCS base site equipment, have a desire to obtain instant information on site availability for call processing regardless of their current location and time of day.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

MOTOROLA

Technical Developments

IMPROVED ACCESS METHOD TO A CELLULAR BASE SITE DIAGNOSTIC UNIT

by Jon St. Clair, Cory R. Christensen and Jeffrey D. Hatfield

BACKGROUND

Current service providers, specifically the site service technician and supervisors that use Motorola cellular or PCS base site equipment, have a desire to obtain instant information on site availability for call processing regardless of their current location and time of day.

Motorola's radio frequency diagnostic unit (RFDS) currently provides site diagnostic capability, but diagnostic information is only available to an operator at the radio subsystem operations and maintenance center. Tests are scheduled and results are logged and scripts are run to extract diagnostic status and failure information.

In one PCS product line, the Motorola RFDS uses a modified CDMA mobile subscriber unit to perfonn the RF diagnostic functions. Site technicians in several markets currently resort to calling the CDMA subscriber unit at a specific site to hear their voice echo back. This method verifies that at least one sector and carrier at the site can process calls.

This simple test is limited also. It provides only basic functionality information on a small portion of the base site, one sector only, and provides no RF parametric information. Many times the operator performs this kind of testing after an event such as a thunder storm, ice storm or power outage.

BENEFITS OF INVENTION

This invention allows the site technician to obtain much more information about the site by simply calling a subscriber embedded in the standard diagnostic equipment. Such a call can be initiated from anywhere the technician may be, at home or at another site, or on the road. This invention solves the problem of making basic information on site

Motorola, Inc. 2000

performance instantly available to any operator or technician, upon demand, without requiring any kind of highly specialized terminal devices. This feature provides customers with a tangible improvement in maintenance convenience unique to this industry.

INVENTION DESCRIPTION AND UNIQUENESS

This invention adds a basic DTMF tone decoder and voice synthesizer to the existing mobile subscriber unit embedded in the site diagnostic subsystem. These common elements permit an operator to command the diagnostic subsystem, via DTMF tones, to report on the current cell site status through .

synthesized voice reports.

The diagnostic subsystem routinely performs background site monitoring, testing and limjt analysis. The results are logged, condensed and summarized into a report generated in both synthesized voice format and in simple Asrn format for remote download to a computer. This invention is unique for the following reasons:

. Cell site diagnostic functions that communicate test results with either a voice or data over the very wireless air in...