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Probe Attachment Mechanism for Measurement of Heat-sinked Components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000009968D
Publication Date: 2002-Oct-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 106K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for creating a probe attachment mechanism (PAM) test tool that measures the surface temperature beneath the heat sink of packages and board surfaces. The disclosed method requires no glue or extensive preparation, and it also improves the accuracy of measuring temperatures.

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Probe Attachment Mechanism for Measurement of Heat-sinked Components

Disclosed is a method for creating a probe attachment mechanism (PAM) test tool that measures the surface temperature beneath the heat sink of packages and board surfaces. The disclosed method requires no glue or extensive preparation, and it also improves the accuracy of measuring temperatures.

Background

Currently, temperatures are measured by attaching a thermocouple junction to the surface with a high conductivity cement, glue, or epoxy (see Figure 2). This process is very tedious because the area beneath the heat sink is generally difficult to access. In addition, a large hole must be drilled to not only route the thermocouple wire and attach the thermocouple junction, but also due to epoxy bond deposit.

The epoxy may contaminate the case surface, and leave residue that creates a layer surrounding the attach-point.  This layer can increase contact thermal resistance between the package top and the heat-sinking surface.  For example, a heat sink may not sit flatly on the uneven attach bond created by the epoxy, or the epoxy may deposit under the thermocouple junction.  An experienced experimenter is usually aware of these micro-phenomenon contribute to error in measurement though is usually unable to affect a change in test setup even if discovered.  The results may become irreproducible and a large number of samples may be required to justify them.

General Description

The PAM is composed of three major co...