Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Adjustable Strength Magnet System for a Cochlear Implant Headpiece

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010043D
Publication Date: 2002-Oct-16
Document File: 4 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The magnetic force provided by the headpiece of a cochlear implant system is adjustable through the use of one or more external magnets, or magnetic components, that are inserted between the headpiece and the skin or scalp of the user. The external magnets, or magnetic components, are held in place on the underside of the headpiece by the magnet within the headpiece. The external magnet or magnetic components are made from different materials or dimensions so as to provide a variety of magnetic forces which the user can readily select and easily change without having to open the headpiece.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 47% of the total text.

� SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1Adjustable Strength Magnet System for a Cochlear Implant Headpiece

Abstract

The magnetic force provided by the headpiece of a cochlear implant system is adjustable through the use of one or more external magnets, or magnetic components, that are inserted between the headpiece and the skin or scalp of the user.� The external magnets, or magnetic components, are held in place on the underside of the headpiece by the magnet within the headpiece.� The external magnet or magnetic components are� made from different materials or dimensions so as to provide a variety of magnetic forces which the user can readily select and easily change without having to open the headpiece.

Background

ICS systems typically include implantable and external components.� The implantable components include a receiver, an implantable pulse generator and an electrode array, which electrode array is inserted into the cochlea, through which the electrical stimuli are applied.� The external components include a power source, a microphone, a speech processor, and a headpiece.� The microphone senses sound waves in conventional manner and converts such sensed sound waves to an electrical signal.� The electrical signal is then processed by the speech processor and converted into an appropriate control signal that is transmitted to the implantable receiver/stimulator.

In operation, the power and control signals are transmitted to the implantable receiver/stimulator through a primary coil located in the headpiece, and are received through a secondary coil included within the implantable receiver/stimulator.� In order to operate efficiently, i.e., in order for the headpiece to be able to transcutaneously (i.e., through the skin) transmit the control signal to the implantable receiver/stimulator, it is necessary that the primary coil in the headpiece be placed in close alignment with the secondary coil in the implantable receiver/stimulator.

The most common technique for retaining the headpiece of a transcutaneous-type implantable cochlear stimulation system is the use of two permanent magnets.� One magnet resides in the implantable receiver/stimulator near the center of the secondary coil.� The other magnet resides in the headpiece near the center of the primary coil. The use of magnets to retain the headpiece is very simple, effective, and cosmetically attractive.� However, there are several drawbacks to this method of headpiece retention. Some users have thick skin flaps that increase the separation of the magnets and reduce their attracting force. Physically active children and adults have found magnetic headpiece retention insufficient. Additionally, the internal magnet may interfere with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) diagnosis.� Some users have thin flaps and are overly sensitive to high magnetic forces.� Other users are very sensitive to high magnetic forces shortly following surgery.

It is known to adjust the magnetic strength through the use of shims...