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Method for a helical rolling-crimping assembly of fins on a Cu core heatsink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010050D
Publication Date: 2002-Oct-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 161K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a helical rolling-crimping assembly of fins on a copper (Cu) core heatsink. Benefits include improved thermal performance and improved ease of manufacturing.

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Method for a helical rolling-crimping assembly of fins on a Cu core heatsink

Disclosed is a method for a helical rolling-crimping assembly of fins on a copper (Cu) core heatsink. Benefits include improved thermal performance and improved ease of manufacturing.

Background

        � � � � � Conventional assembly of thin fins onto a Cu cylindrical core requires the press fitting or soldering of uniformly separated, stacked fins. The interface resistance between the Cu core and these loosely assembled fins reduces the heatsink’s thermal performance especially for high performance thermal solutions that rely upon low conduction resistance.

Description

        � � � � � The disclosed method reduces the interface resistance between thin fins and Cu core in tower heatsinks. A crimped fin approach (i.e. forging of fin into Cu channel) can be used in a rolling manner with the fin being assembled in a continuous (or semi-continuous) helical fashion.� The fin material is rolled and turned to form a helical spring shape with a very flat profile (see Figure 1).� A billet of Cu material is turned as a helical channel is cut into the surface (see Figure 2). After the channel is cut, the fin coils are rotated and directed into the channel (see Figure 3).� The fin-feeding step may require some working of the fin material.� Then, a crimping tool collapses the channel around the fin forming a tight interface.� A backside traveler may be used to support the force required for forming the copper during crimpin...