Browse Prior Art Database

Method to add markup language tags for adhering to laws of different jurisdiction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010325D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Nov-20
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Nov-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to add markup language tags to web pages which will ease in the adherence to the laws in the different jurisdictions for allowable content. This is achieved by portal servers inserting markup tags after consultation with national consultation servers so that they will not beheld liable for contents on their site. The resulting web page is routed through Integrated Service Providers which filter the content based on these tags.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Method to add markup language tags for adhering to laws of different jurisdiction

Disclosed is a method to add markup language tags for adhering to laws of different jurisdictions. Many countries determine that certain web content is not appropriate for its citizens. It would impose a huge infrastructure burden on the web portal servers to conform to restrictions imposed by foreign governments. By not adhering to these restrictions, the portals may face costly and time consuming law suits.

Using the disclosed method, when a request for a document is made from a browser, it is routed through an integrated service provider (ISP) or a centralized list of servers. A national consultation server maintains a table of keywords and associated tags that need to be included. The national server also maintains a sample collection of documents. After consultation with the national server, the portal server alters the original text include markup tags. When ISP's receive the page, it could choose to display the contents, display the contents with a warning or not display the page at all. Similarly, a plug-in software could be used to filter the contents.

By adding the meta-tags, the portal can make good faith effort not to distribute materials that are considered offensive. But the actual enforcement responsibility would rest on the ISP's within the countries.

The portals and the national consultation server could use several methods to determine if the country specific tags...