Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Patterning Using Unconventional Shadow Masks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010671D
Publication Date: 2003-Jan-08
Document File: 4 page(s) / 281K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of patterning a variety of materials, such as gold, chromium, nickel, etc., using unconventional shadow masks. Benefits include simplifying the patterning process and reducing process costs.

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Method of Patterning Using Unconventional Shadow Masks

Disclosed is a method of patterning a variety of materials, such as gold, chromium, nickel, etc., using unconventional shadow masks. Benefits include simplifying the patterning process and reducing process costs.

Background

Currently, patterning is a multi-step, traditional lift-off process that uses a number of wet chemicals. This process is complex and costly, and relies on specially made shadow masks.

General Description

The disclosed method is a one-step, dry process; unlike the current state of the art, the disclosed method uses shadow masks that are commercially available or easily made in-house. For example, a variety of TEM grids with different designs and feature sizes are available commercially. Also, block copolymers and polymer thin films can be used as shadow masks.

The disclosed method’s process is shown in Fig. 1. The TEM grid(s) are used as shadow masks, and are mounted onto the substrate of choice (silicon, mica, gold on mica etc.) using Kapton tape or glue. Additionally or alternatively, polymer or block copolymer thin film is spun or spotted on the substrate to create different shadow mask patterns. The material that needs to be patterned is sputtered or evaporated onto the substrate with the unconventional shadow mask. After sputtering or evaporation, the shadow mask is removed, leaving the deposited material pattern on the substrate.

Figures 2 and 3 show SEM micrographs of gold patterns fabricated...