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Method for network packet filtering to eliminate unreliability in remote system management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010674D
Publication Date: 2003-Jan-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for network packet filtering to eliminate unreliability in remote system management. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, improved reliability, and improved ease of design.

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Method for network packet filtering to eliminate unreliability in remote system management

Disclosed is a method for network packet filtering to eliminate unreliability in remote system management. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, improved reliability, and improved ease of design.

Background

System Management Bus (SMBus) specification is a trademarked name owned by www.smbus.org. Version 2.0 was released August 3, 2002.�

� � � � � In typical large networks, client management is achieved through remote management using system management commands sent over the network. These commands originate from the system management central console to the remote client, which decodes the commands and then takes appropriate action. The console sends these commands to the client’s system management controller (SMC) over the network at the speeds of up to 1Gbits/Second via the local area network (LAN) controller also residing in the remote client. This SMC interfaces to the LAN via a relatively slow system management bus (SMBus) capable of running no faster than 400 Kbits/second internal to the remote client.

� � � � � The LAN controller or the SMC logic can be implemented as discrete components or it could be integrated in other system components. During low-power system states, the LAN controller stores the incoming packet on the network and forwards it to the SMC over the slower SMBus. The SMC analyzes the packet and determines if it is a system management (SM) packet or not. Non-SM packets are ignored while SM packets result in some action by the client.

� � � � � Current generation LAN controllers forward all incoming network packets matching its individual address (IA) or network broadcasts to SMC. In a high Ethernet traffic environment, the LAN controller buffer storage c...