Browse Prior Art Database

Method for a visual 3-D RF spectrum display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010720D
Publication Date: 2003-Jan-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a visual three-dimensional (3-D) radio frequency (RF) spectrum display. Benefits include improved functionality and improved usability.

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Method for a visual 3-D RF spectrum display

Disclosed is a method for a visual three-dimensional (3-D) radio frequency (RF) spectrum display. Benefits include improved functionality and improved usability.

Background

        � � � � � Conventionally, RF footprinting for transmitted patterns is calculated manually using theoretical methods. RF field strength measurements are taken, providing only limited near-field readings. Licensed transmitting stations provide latitude and longitude, along with effective radiated power (ERP) and directional antenna azimuths. Antenna footprint patterns are then derived and assumed. However, transmitted patterns vary because of environmental conditions. The antenna pattern that is manually calculated is not actually the pattern being transmitted.

        � � � � � Undocumented RF sources (such as electronic machinery, magnetic induction, and sources not complying to FCC rule/regulation Part 15), which are being radiated into the atmosphere, are not being tacked because they are unknown. No way exists to identify them or determine their dB strength or radiating RF footprints.

        � � � � � Conventional solutions yield:

•        � � � � 2-Dimensional real-time viewing of RF sources

•        � � � � Direction finding (DF)

•        � � � � All RF sources viewed equally during analysis and not uniquely identifiable

•        � � � � Antenna foot-printing calculations done manually, based on antenna text book theory and field strength meter readings, resulting in a “best guess” scenario

•        � � � � No capability so see if and where RF overlap occurs between different RF sources

Description

        � � � � � The disclosed method is a visual 3-D radio frequency (RF) spectrum display that provides information about beams and wave patterns. The information is obtained by a series of receiving stations, analyzed by a computer program, and displayed for the user (see Figure 1).

        � � � � � Three or more outdoor fixed wide-band receiving stations are installed in an elevated location above local terrain (such as a mountain top, office building, or tall communications towers within a metropolitan city). Alternatively, three or more indoor wide-band receiving stations may be located within a building, facility, or manufacturing area. The wide-band receiving stations are

connected in a triangulation (or greater) configuration. A GPS receiver identifies a point of reference by latitude and longitude. All other components can be installed at the wide-band receiving station locations or a remote sit...